Dalmatian figurine worth $425 plus


July 07, 1991|By James G. McCollam | James G. McCollam,Copley News Service

Q: This figurine belonged to my husband's grandfather. How old is it and what is its value? There are these markings on the bottoms of the feet: "Royal Doulton, Made in England, ch. Goworth Victor." It is 8 inches tall.

A: This figurine of a famous Dalmatian, Champion Goworth Victor, was made in the early 1900s. It is a choice collectible and would probably sell for $425 to $450.

Q: The enclosed mark is on a platter with an Oriental-style scene. It is 15 inches by 10 inches and is slightly crazed. Can you tell me anything about it? I would like to know especially when it was made and its value.

A: This was made by Charles Meigh & Son in Hanley, England, during the mid-19th century; "Java" is the name of the pattern. In good condition, it would sell for $75 to $85.

Q: We have acquired a stoneware bottle or jug imprinted "The Adaptable Hot Water Bottle and Bed Warmer." Have you any idea when this was made and what it might be worth?

A: Hot water bed warmers have been used for over 200 years, but this one was probably made about 1900. An antique shop would be likely to price it in the $35 to $45 range.

Q: My Sevres cup and saucer has the interlaced "L" mark enclosing "EE." I understand this mark indicates that these were made in 1782. Please evaluate them for me.

A: Assuming that your cup and saucer are authentic, they should be worth $800 to $900. If you have never had these authenticated by a museum, you should, because many of the porcelain pieces bearing Sevres marks are fakes.

Send your questions about antiques with picture(s), a detailed description, a stamped, self-addressed envelope and $1 per item to James G. McCollam, P.O. Box 1087, Notre Dame, Ind. 46556. All questions will be answered; published pictures cannot be returned. Mr. McCollam is a member of the Antique Appraisers Association of America.

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