Maryland primitive paintings on display at Eubie Blake

GALLERIES

July 05, 1991|By Eric Adams

EUBIE BLAKE CULTURAL CENTER

409 N. Charles St. "Local Color and Other Colors."

Claire Freeman, a prize-winning Maryland folk artist whose career didn't begin until she turned 50, has 35 of her paintings on display (through July 30) in this show that opens with a reception today from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Described by critics and artists as a true primitive painter with a style all her own, Ms. Freeman has never had any formal art training. Among the works featured here is "A Photo Finish," which will be donated to the planned American Museum of American Visionary Art; she won the juried grand prize "Governor's Award" in 1984 for this work. Call 396-1300.

CONRAD-MILLER GALLERY

2007 Fleet St., Fells Point. "Nautical Art."

Timed to coincide with the Fells Point Maritime Festival earlier this month, this exhibit of nautical art (through July 28) represents the work of 12 artists, all members of the Fells Point Realists, a cooperative organization of painters who receive instruction in realism at Conrad-Miller. According to co-owner Nancy Conrad, the only common denominator in the work -- despite the nautical theme -- is realism. Styles and technique vary widely, as do subjects -- skipjacks, tugboats, lighthouses. Call 563-3190.

MIDDLETON GALLERY

30 West St., Annapolis. "New Works by Albert Swayhoover."

Scenes of the New England coastline, upstate New York and some of the more historical architecture that can be found in each region dominate this one-man show (through July 31) by New York artist Albert Swayhoover. These oil paintings, done entirely with a pallette knife, are of Queene Anne Victorian houses by the sea and stone barns. Gallery owner Carolyn Middleton calls them "very crisp, very clear and architecturally accurate." Typical of the beach settings are sunsets and sunrises, described by Ms. Middleton as "very serene." Call 269-0218.

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