Evans may be out until after breakBaltimore Orioles right...

Orioles notes

July 03, 1991|By Peter Schmuck

Evans may be out until after break

Baltimore Orioles right fielder Dwight Evans probably will not return to the active roster until after the All-Star break, but he has not given up on getting back into action sooner.

"It was recommended that he wait until after the break," manager John Oates said yesterday. "That's probably what we'll do."

Evans, who has been on the disabled list for nearly three weeks with a sore Achilles tendon, concedes that another week on the sidelines might help, but said he's still holding out the slim hope of playing in New York this weekend.

"We talked about the All-Star break," he said, "but if I feel good, I'll talk to them again."

The problem has been diagnosed as chronic tendinitis, which means that it is something that Evans has had before and may have again, but it apparently is something with which he has learned to play.

"I've had it before, but it has never gotten this bad," he said. "I played with it for three weeks. Usually, I back off for a day or two and it's no problem. I didn't back off this time. I really wanted to play at Fenway Park."

Oates said that Evans asked team doctors to give him an injection to lessen the inflammation, but was told that it would increase the likelihood that the tendon would rupture. Instead, he has turned to orthotics (specially designed shoe inserts) to help lessen the strain on his Achilles' tendon.

"It's not going to keep me down," he said. "Do I feel like I could play today. Maybe not. Maybe not tomorrow. But it feels much better."

McDonald feels no pain

Right-hander Ben McDonald apparently passed the lasobstacle to his continued presence in the major-league starting rotation. He said he felt no unusual soreness on the day after his eight-inning, two-hit performance against the Tigers.

"When I woke up, I felt about the same as I have the last couple of times out," McDonald said.

Most pitchers experience some arm stiffness for a couple days after a lengthy outing. McDonald is accustomed to that, but the soreness was far more severe before he went on the disabled list.

Subliminal advertising dept.

Red, white and blue pompons were distributed free to fanlast night so they could take part in the Desert Storm salute at Memorial Stadium. The pompons, featuring an American flag on the handle, were sponsored by Merry-Go-Round Enterprises.

Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, the local business mogul who wants to buy the Orioles, is founder and the largest stockholder in Merry-Go-Round.

Ripken's charity drive

Cal Ripken has raised $42,066 for his Reading, Runs anRipken literacy program. The money is raised through pledges tied to Ripken's offensive production, so it has been a very profitable half-season for his latest literacy-related project.

Ripken redux

Ripken's 18 home runs are the most by a shortstop at this point in the season since the Boston Red Sox's Rico Petrocelli had 23 after 74 games in 1969. Petrocelli went on to set an American League record for homers by a shortstop, with 40. The major-league record is held by Ernie Banks, who hit 47 in 1958.

Martinez honored

Minor-league outfielder Chito Martinez was named Orioles minor-league Player of the Month for June after batting .362 with nine home runs and 22 RBI in 31 games. Martinez is batting .325 overall with a league-leading 18 home runs, but he doesn't appear to be in line for a promotion.

"We're not going to make changes just for the sake of making changes," Oates said. "We want him to play, and he wouldn't be playing regularly up here."

Miscellaneous

Tonight, the Orioles wives will hold their canned food drive tbenefit the Maryland Food Bank. The drive netted 8 tons of canned food last year. The game will be followed by a fireworks show. . . . A delegation from Michigan, including Tigers president Bo Schembechler, will tour the stadium project today.

Orioles notes

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