Gerald Hopple, professor, dies at 42

July 03, 1991

Services for Gerald W. Hopple, an expert on computer operations and national security and an associate professor at George Mason University, will be held at 1 p.m. today at the Connelly Funeral Home, 300 Mace Ave., Essex.

Dr. Hopple, who was 42, collapsed and died Friday at his home in Washington.

He was an associate professor of information systems and systems engineering since 1987 at George Mason where he earlier lectured on national security and international relations. He also taught at the Defense Intelligence College and at the University of Maryland, where he lectured on national security after serving as an assistant professor.

In addition, he was a research scientist or consultant at various times for Mystech Associates Inc., Synergy Inc., International Information Systems Inc., Defense Systems Inc. and the Battelle Memorial Institute.

He was also a former vice president of the International Public Policy Research Corp.

He wrote, edited or contributed to 17 books and many professional papers about computing, artificial intelligence, psychology and national security affairs.

Born in Baltimore, Dr. Hopple was a graduate of Kenwood High School and, with greatest honors, from Western Maryland College. He earned a master's degree and a doctorate at the University of Maryland.

He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Omicron Delta Kappa and Pi Gamma Mu honorary societies.

Also, he belonged to the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Association for Computing Machinery and the International Society of Political Psychology.

He was also a manuscript reviewer or editor for several publishers and professional organizations.

Dr. Hopple is survived by his mother, Edith Hopple of Essex; two brothers, Thomas W. Hopple of Cub Hill and Daniel M. Hopple of Delta, Pa.; two nieces; three nephews; a grandnephew; and two grandnieces.

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