Classic Cobbler Old-fashioned dessert blends seasonal fruits

June 26, 1991|By Sherrie Clinton | Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff

YOUR grandmother and quite probably her grandmother made cobblers every summer -- and with good reason. This simple, old-fashioned dessert is a delicious way to use whatever seasonal fruits you might have on hand. Slightly mushy fruit are OK.

The dessert goes together quickly, but be sure to allow enough time to peel, chop and pit the fruit. The cobbler keeps well and the recipe is easy to double so I always make two.

This recipe is from a new book: "Bradley Ogden's Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner" by Bradley Ogden; Random House dInc.--1991, $27.50.

Summer Fruit Cobbler

Fruit Filling:

1/3 cup sugar, more or less according to taste

2 tablespoons flour

4 cups mixed fruit (cherries, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, sliced peaches, nectarines or plums)

Dough:

3/4 cup flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 1/2 teaspoons double-acting baking powder

1 tablespoon sugar

2 tablespoons cold unsalted butter

1/2 cup cream or half-and-half

Sugar for sprinkling, optional

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

To prepare the fruit filling: toss the sugar and flour with the fruit in a medium bowl.

To prepare the dough: sift the flour, salt, baking powder and one tablespoon sugar into a medium bowl. Cut the butter into the flour mixture until it resembles coarse meal. Stir in the cream with a fork, mixing until just blended.

Toss the fruit once more and pour half of the fruit into the bottom of an 8-by-8-inch baking dish. Dot the fruit with about one-third of the dough mixture. Add the rest of the fruit to the baking dish. Drop tablespoons of the dough on top of the fruit and sprinkle dough lightly with sugar.

Place the cobbler on the middle rack of the preheated oven. Bake for about 30 minutes or until the dough is golden brown and the fruit is bubbling in the center. Let cool 15 minutes before serving. Serves four.

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