Is an offer of $700 too little for 1920 Jefferson lamp?


June 23, 1991|By James G. McCollam | James G. McCollam,Copley News Service

Q: I have a lamp marked "Jefferson" on a very heavy base. It looks like a seashore scene. A New York dealer offered me $700 for it, but I think I should get more. What do you think?

A: Your reverse painted lamp was made by the Jefferson Co. in Chicago about 1920. A dealer would probably sell this for about $1,200. He would be willing to pay $600 to $700; dealers are in business to make a profit.

Q: What can you tell me about a two-handled chamber pot with some weird decoration? It has a frog on the inner side of the pot and a leering face in the bottom. It is also decorated with pink luster.

A: Your bawdy potty was probably made by Dixon, Austin & Co. in Sunderland, England, about 1850. These are extremely popular with collectors and frequently sell for over $500.

Q: While cleaning out the attic we found an old tin sign with the picture of an Indian. It appears to be an advertisement for None Such Mince Meat. The sign measures 28 by 20 inches. Is this very valuable?

A: The sign you describe was issued in 1890 and depicts an Onandaga Indian chief. In really good condition, it would probably sell for at least $2,000.

Q: I recently discovered an old magazine, Official Detective Stories, December 1936. The cover is a picture of a woman attacking another woman with a dagger. Does it have any value?

A: All old detective magazines are collectible because their stories are based on real crimes. This one would probably sell for about $10 to $15 in very good condition.

Send your questions about antiques with picture(s), a detailed description, a stamped, self-addressed envelope and $1 per item to James G. McCollam, P.O. Box 1087, Notre Dame, Ind. 46556. All questions will be answered; published pictures cannot be returned. Mr. McCollam is a member of the Antique Appraisers Association of America.

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