Charles O. Hazard Graphic artist

June 21, 1991

Charles Oliver Hazard, a retired graphic arts director, died Wednesday evening from a stroke that felled him on Sunday. He was 77.

A Mass of Christian burial for him will be offered at 11:30 a.m. Saturday at St. Charles Roman Catholic Church on Church Lane in Pikesville.

Born in 1914, Mr. Hazard spent his childhood on Hollins Street in West Baltimore. He attended City College, then went to the Maryland Institute of Art. While studying there, he also worked as a stone lithographer for the Maryland Lithograph Co.

Mr. Hazard later became an assistant lettering instructor to Arthur Miller at the Maryland Institute. He also met his future wife, Stella Dernoga, there. She was a fine arts instructor in watercolor and drawing. They were married in 1942 and had just celebrated their 49th wedding anniversary.

During World War II, he worked as a topographical engineer with British Intelligence in Cheltenham, England, mapping the French coastline in preparation for D-day. He was then transferred to the Pacific theater, where he served with combat engineers from New Guinea in the Philippines and in Japan.

After the war, he worked in the advertising art department of TheBaltimore Sun, then went on to become art director of the Foster & Green Advertising Agency in Baltimore until he retired.

Mr. Hazard was active in the Pikesville Optimist Club for many years, the St. Charles Holy Name Society and his beloved "Club Boomerang," which was founded in the 1920s as a West Baltimore Boy Scout group and meets monthly to this day.

He continued doing free-lance artwork and was honored during one of Pope John Paul II's visits to Washington when a piece of his artwork was presented to the pope as a gift from a group of local handicapped persons.

Mr. Hazard is survived by his wife, Stella Dernoga Hazard; two children, Charles R. Hazard and Carla Tomaszewski; a brother, Arthur Hazard; his mother-in-law, Martha Dernoga; and six grandchildren.

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