Jordan accepts MVP Jeep, but it's golf cart he's looking for

June 19, 1991|By Paul Sullivan | Paul Sullivan,Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO -- Imagine being 28 years old and having no career goals left to pursue.

Perhaps you also can imagine for a moment what it feels like to be Michael Jordan, who accepted his 1991 NBA Finals Most Valuable Player trophy and a new Jeep Cherokee yesterday, then admitted he has no more mountains left to scale.

"I've accomplished everything," Jordan said. "Individually, as well as team [goals]. Now it's just a matter of duplicating them. And I don't mind doing that."

Jordan, who has an '82 NCAA title, a gold medal from the 1984 Olympics, five scoring titles, two regular-season MVP trophies and an All-Star Game MVP trophy under his belt, thanked his teammates for his latest piece of hardware.

But, he added with a laugh, just don't ask him for the wheels.

"My thanks go to my teammates and to the organization of the Chicago Bulls," he said. "But I don't know if I'm going to let anyone borrow the Jeep."

In his final meeting with the media before beginning a summer agenda crammed with (surprise!) golf and commercial endorsements, Jordan expounded on a number of subjects, major and minor.

* On his immediate plans:

"Just relax and and get my golf game in shape, enjoy my family and fulfill my endorsement obligations."

* On the Bulls' attempts to re-sign free agents John Paxson and Bill Cartwright:

"I'd love for that to happen. I appreciate these guys."

* On Scottie Pippen's new $18 million contract:

"I think he's worthy. I couldn't care less what he makes, as long as I know he's going to step on the court and play the basketball that I like to see him play."

* On what a longtime Chevy endorser would do with the MVP Jeep:

"I'm not really going to move this Jeep. I think this is a trophy for me. We're just going to sit it out on the yard . . . leave it for my kids. When they're 16, they'll have something to drive."

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