High-tech 'incubator' at UMBC fills up

COMMERCIAL REALTY NOTES

June 19, 1991|By Edward Gunts

The first phase of the Technology Enterprise Center, an "incubator" for high-technology businesses at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, has reached tenant capacity with the addition of two new businesses.

Password, a company that Russell Loane and Tim Armstrong formed to develop customized computer software to accompany instructional texts for math and science at the college and primary school levels, opened May 28. In Vitro Alternatives Inc., a company that seeks to develop new clinical tests that will eliminate the need for live animal experimentation, will open tomorrow.

Established by Paul Silber and Charles Ruegg, In Vitro Alternatives is a spinoff of a Texas-based company of the same name. According to UMBC, Mr. Silber, a Baltimore native, wanted to return to the area to be close to the large number of scientific firms and research enterprises in Maryland and to take advantage of the state's proximity to East Coast pharmaceutical companies.

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Members of the Urban Design Committee of the Baltimore chapter of the American Institute of Architects have launched a letter-writing campaign in opposition to a plan by developer Leonard Attman to buy a lane of Redwood Street between Charles Street and Wine Alley. He wants to build an office tower, Baltimore Financial Centre, at the south east corner of Charles and Redwood.

In preparation for a Planning Commission meeting on the project June 27, the architects are trying to get many of the most respected and influential architects in Baltimore to sign a petition opposing the sale of any part of Redwood Street for a development project.

The architects have argued that city officials would be setting a bad precedent by selling part of a city street so a developer can enlarge a construction site, especially when numerous other vacant lots downtown are ready to develop without encroaching on a public thoroughfare.

The Planning Commission meeting will start at 1:30 p.m. on the eighth floor of the municipal building at 417 E. Fayette St. Any sale of part of Redwood Street also would need City Council approval.

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