Self-serving agencies for handicappedI am writing in...

the Forum

June 10, 1991

Self-serving agencies for handicapped

I am writing in regard to Wiley Hall 3rd's recent column about the young lady who, despite being intelligent and well-educated, has difficulty in securing a position because she has cerebral palsy.

I would suggest that those so-called human service agencies that purport to serve the handicapped get their own houses in order as a first step in rectifying unemployment among the handicapped.

Many of these agencies are run for the benefit and convenience of the directors and administrators. They are self-serving and extremely arrogant. United Cerebral Palsy has no employees with cerebral palsy. Community Services for the Deaf has no deaf employees. Kennedy Institute has no handicapped employees. Gallagher Services has a definite anti-handicap employment policy.

Let those who live in glass edifices throw no stones!

George Rupp

Baltimore

Better birth control

We build better and more humane mouse traps -- why don't we make better condoms to avoid pregnancies? We'd be attacking the cause and stopping the senseless bickering on abortion, the effect of which is tearing us apart.

B.J. Small

Baltimore

Pagoda and caddy

Even now after 60 years I still remember what a great pleasure I experienced during a first reading of "Salad Days," how H.L. Mencken brought to my consciousness the special atmosphere of Hollins Market and the surrounding neighborhood.

What a job he might have done upon seeing the picture and article about the 99-year-old Patterson Park Pagoda (Evening Sun, May 6)! During our formative years, growing up on Patterson Park Avenue in the shadow of the structure, we were told, correctly or not, that it had been created as a kind of memorial to Commodore Matthew Perry for his courageous exploits and diplomatic achievements in opening Japan to world trade and communication.

Despite our proximity, we were only rarely permitted to enter the building because all too often it was considered structurally unsound and unsafe. On a rare occasion, probably when a maintenance man might be on an upper level and difficult to discern, someone would romantically report that the pagoda was haunted by an Oriental ghost, but that prospect generally was given little credence.

Nonetheless, the Gough Street intersection (even with its cobblestones) was the locale for certain games, notably "caddy," a prerequisite for which was a mother's discarded broom. Her son would appear bearing the broom and a saw, and after cutting and removing the straw end, we had the very useful four feet of round wood. Of this, about six inches was neatly sawed, and this short piece became the "caddy" used in the game.

Brooklyn, N.Y., and The Bronx feature stick ball and other sidewalk games, but I have never encountered anyone away from Baltimore who recognized caddy as a boys' game.

Oh, ghosts of Mencken-san and Perry-san, look down from your high places and smile benevolently when you see the "Baltimore boys of caddy" in the shadow of the Patterson Park Pagoda!

Paul A. Rohde

Baltimore

Sneaky tax

The article by Sylvia Porter on the "sneaky tax" in The Evening Sun on May 22 was excellent.

The "sneaky tax" can also apply where people sell their home in order to go into a retirement home. What needs to be done is to index all the dollar amounts in the tax code to the Consumer Price Index, such as the $3,000 loss limitation for capital losses.

This limitation has been the same for so many years it is ridiculous and a travesty in a capitalist country, especially with the inflation that we have experienced over the years.

Gerard H. Kessler

Towson

One culture

An item in "Newswatch" (Evening Sun, May 30) reports that the Coalition of Concerned African American Organizations has made the charge that Baltimore County schools have failed to address cultural differences in educating black students.

How can Baltimore County schools address the differences of our "oh, so many" different cultural origins? If one needs addressing, so must all. In the name of democracy we cannot address one cultural difference at the expense of numerous others. This is not the function of our public school system.

In this, our America, we must all strive for a culture unique to us as Americans. Foreign cultures have no place here and are unnecessary. We must all unite under one culture ` we black, yellow, white, red, Eastern, Western, Northern or Southern. This would solve the many-faceted bigotry problems that are so unique to America.

lanche K. Coda

Baltimore

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