Hopkins' Children's House under way

SYLVIA'S BALTIMORE

June 07, 1991|By SYLVIA BADGER

THE OFFICIAL groundbreaking of The Children's House at Johns Hopkins takes place at noon on June 11. The house, a project of the Grant-A-Wish Foundation, will feature 18 guest suites with lots of amenities when it is scheduled to open in early 1992.

Building this house became a dream for Grant-A-Wish board member Stewart J. Greenebaum. After a tour of the Children's Center at Hopkins, Greenebaum was appalled to see families of ill children sleeping in chairs and halls, because they could not afford hotel rooms while their children were being treated. Greenebaum and his wife, Marlene, gave $800,000 as seed money and Hopkins donated the land.

The construction of the house is likened to an old-fashioned barn-raising and Maryland companies and labor unions have donated generously. But there's still quite a list of services and equipment needed to complete the house. Among the most important of the needs are air conditioning equipment, furniture, lumber, electrical conduit and wire, and kitchen/laundry appliances.

If you would like to donate or get more information, call Steve Miller at 547-7288.

HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE: On page 219 of the new edition of the Guinness Book of World Records, there is a reference to the Erickson family, three of whom live and work in the Baltimore area. They are listed under the category: Education -- Most graduates in family. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Erickson of Naples, Fla, saw all of their 14 children -- 11 sons and four daughters -- obtain university or college degrees between 1962 and 1978.

All of the Erickson sons and daughters earned scholastic scholarships or paid their own way through school.

Three of the sons live and work in the Baltimore area -- John Erickson is the founder of Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. His brother, Michael, has been the director of marketing at Charlestown since it opened in 1984. And another brother, Paul, an accountant and attorney, has just joined the company as chief financial officer.

Two other brothers also have Baltimore connections: Harold earned his doctorate in biophysics at Hopkins, and Frank graduated from St. Mary's in Roland Park. What an incredible family of achievers!

On July 3, the Meyerhoff Symphony will be the scene of a stroll down memory lane for many Lawrence Welk fans. Myron Floren -- he was Welk's assistant band leader who played the accordion -- will be bringing what is being touted as the Stars of the Lawrence Welk Show here for two performances at 1 and 5 p.m.. This will be the first time the musicians have gotten together since the show went off the air more than a decade ago.

Welk fans may remember the piano-playing dynamo Jo Ann Castle, dancing duo Bobby Burgess and Barbara Boylan, dancer and singer Arthur Duncan and tenor Joe Feeney, a Welk show regular for 26 years. Ticket prices range from $18.50 to $25 and I'm sure they'll sell quickly. Call 783-8000 if you'd like to attend.

Sheldon Good & Company auctioneers, rated as America's largest real estate auctioneers by Forbes mag, and Alex Cooper Auctioneers, will start the bidding on 45 luxury Colonnade condos tomorrow at noon at Stouffer Inner Harbor Hotel.

Fifteen of the units are guaranteed to be sold to the highest bidder regardless of price and the choices will include executive studios, one-, two- and three-bedroom units, previously $138,000 $494,500, which are expected to bring from $50,000 to $150,000 at the auction. A spectacular 6,000-square-foot duplex will be offered for sale at the price of $1.3 million. Don't groan, if you buy it, they throw in a new Rolls Royce Corniche auto, sans chauffeur.

Our Guy Friday

NAME: Steve Miller

CLAIM TO FAME: Volunteer construction manager of the Children's House at Johns Hopkins.

WORK LIFE: Senior construction manager for DRC Incorporated.

PASSIONS: Golf, gardening, computers and work.

HEROES: My dad, my first boss and Jim Knowles, the volunteer project manager for The Children's House.

QUOTE: "I have never worked on a project that was as much of a professional and emotional challenge."

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