The Rev. C.E. Fletcher, Baptist minister

June 03, 1991

The Rev. Charles Edmond Fletcher Sr., pastor of Pentecost Baptist Church, died Friday of a heart attack in the Pentecost Baptist Church gardens, which he designed and maintained and where he prayed every morning. He was 54.

Services for Mr. Fletcher, who lived on Callaway Avenue in the Ashburton neighborhood, will be held at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Mount Lebanon Baptist Church, 2812 Reisterstown Road.

Born and raised in North Carolina, he moved to Baltimore in 1961.

Initially a member of the Whitestone Baptist Church on Baker Street, Mr. Fletcher later joined Mount Lebanon, where he worked under the Rev. Olin P. Moyd.

Mr. Fletcher was ordained in 1967.

He remained at Mount Lebanon until 1969, when he became pastor of the Pentecost Baptist Church in the 1600 block of Poplar Grove St.

Mr. Fletcher worked briefly as an electronics technician at the Westinghouse Defense & Electronics Systems division.

He also worked for 10 years as a television repairman at the Sears service center on 41st Street before leaving in 1971 to become full-time pastor at Pentecost Baptist.

He was a 1955 graduate of Currituck Union High School in Maple, N.C., earned a bachelor of science degree from Coppin State College in 1978 and later received a master's degree in divinity from Howard University.

Mr. Fletcher was a member of the United National Baptist Missionary Convention of Maryland, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the Coppin Heights Community Organization.

He received numerous awards and citations, including a salute from WJZ-TV and mayoral citations for community service from William Donald Schaefer in 1983 and Kurt L. Schmoke in 1989.

Surviving are his wife of 36 years, the former Mae R. Moore; two sons, the Rev. Charles E. Fletcher Jr. of San Diego, and the Rev. Samuel R. Fletcher of Baltimore; three daughters, Gaye C. Greer, Towanda F. Holiday and Latonya R. Fletcher, all of Baltimore; a brother, Isaiah Fletcher of Baltimore; and six grandchildren.

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