How to fail the job hunt

The Ticker

June 03, 1991|By Julius Westheimer

Did you know that starting your job search too hastily is one of the worst -- and most common -- mistakes you can make? Here, from National Business Employment Weekly, May 26, are five other job-hunting blunders: Failing to check references. ("Few job seekers ask references how they'll respond when employers call; don't assume anything."). . . Writing resumes too quickly. ("Resumes assembled overnight may appear embarrassing or amateurish."). . . Approaching recruiters too soon. ("Be sure of your goals first, or you'll get to wrong employers."). . . Failing to network. ("Not making enough personal contacts causes most job searches to stall."). . . Failing to be tenacious. ("Don't conclude that networking is useless after two months of hard work and no results. You'll lose momentum when success may be imminent.") The article has more mistakes to avoid.

Speaking of being tenacious, I'm told that consumer activist Ralph Nader never returns a telephone call unless he sees at pTC least seven of those pink "call-back" slips piled up from one caller.

CUPID'S ARROW: Baltimore and New York author Lois Wyse, also known as Mrs. Harvey Meyerhoff, has this advice on how managers should deal with office romances. "Don't play Dear Abby and don't be Dr. Ruth. You're not supposed to have answers to romantic questions. You cannot fire people because they fall in love, but you must remind employees that you can fire people who are so preoccupied with their personal lives that they fail to fulfill their job responsibilities, and you can keep your office or department from becoming 'The Dating Game.' " (Bits & Pieces, May 30).

"HE'S NOT IN": "Stop playing telephone tag, the annoying game of 'I call you when you're out, then you call me back but I'm out.' It is common, but it can be stopped," says an article in the Diversified Insurance Co. newsletter. Excerpts: "Make an appointment for a phone call, just as if it's an appointment for a meeting. . . The appointment can be made by yourself or have your secretary call. . . By giving specific messages other than 'call back,' you alert the intended party to the nature and urgency of your call. . . Only use the 'time bomb' approach for people who do not return calls. 'Please tell Mr. Smith that the plan will be filed by noon, Friday, unless we receive notice of any changes by that deadline.' "

BUSINESS CHECKLIST: "One of the advantages of being in business for yourself is the ability to call the shots. Another advantage is the variety of tax-favored benefits available to an owner. Some benefits: Group-term life insurance, $5,000 death benefit, low-interest loans, health and accident insurance, qualified retirement plans, fringe benefits, club memberships, others." (From Harry B. Gorfine Tax Report, June. For complete letter, phone 539-5474.)

JUNE JOURNAL: Recovery ahead? The government reported Friday that its Index of Leading Economic Indicators rose 0.6 percent in April and last week the Dow Jones average vaulted 113 points, its fifth biggest weekly gain in history. . . "Beware of the man who won't be bothered by details." (William Feather, Jr.). . . A round-trip Metroliner coach ticket to and from New York costs $154; the ticket agent at Penn Station told me that in 1974, the same ticket cost $33. . . Your second quarter estimated federal and Maryland income tax payments must be postmarked by midnight two weeks from tonight.

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