City issues report card, gives itself A Schmoke denies his annual report is a campaign brochure.

May 29, 1991|By Michael A. Fletcher | Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff

The 1990 annual report published by the Schmoke administration has the look of a campaign brochure. It's slick, brimming with praise for city government and filled with pictures of happy Baltimoreans doing things like eating crabs and watching the Tour De Trump.

Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who is running for re-election this year, said yesterday the report captures the essence of a well-run administration, and is not campaign fluff.

The city is printing 50,000 copies and mailing them to city employees and community leaders.

Clinton R. Coleman, the mayor's press secretary, says the project will cost the taxpayers at least $45,000.

Schmoke said the cost is justified, even for financially strapped Baltimore, because the report highlights city services that rarely make their way into newspapers or television newscasts.

"We hope to use this to inform people of the full range of services that we're providing," Schmoke said. "Usually, people only hear about services that are reduced or cut."

The 36-page booklet begins with a message from Schmoke, who offers an overview that says Baltimore in the past year has been able to provide more services "even in the face of less money."

The reason: "Great city employees and great management," the report says.

The mayor said that he has been able to reduce the number of people on the city payroll while "keeping layoffs to an absolute minimum."

The report also says that in 1990 more trash was picked up, more graffiti removed, more families settled in homes, more TTC school children given access to computers, more potholes filled and more guns recovered by police than ever before in Baltimore history.

The report then capsulizes hundreds of accomplishments in every corner of city government.

There's praise for the women's apprenticeship program, which provided training in public works skills such as water and electrical systems. Last year, the program boasted 52 graduates, the report says.

The gay and lesbian task force is mentioned. So are library renovations, family literacy programs, the Memorial Stadium task force, drug-free zones and a hundred other things.

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