Glenelg Girls Ambush Middletown In Surprise Track/field Meet Victory

May 22, 1991|By Rick Belz | Rick Belz,Staff writer

Tara Calloway and Debbie Snyder led Glenelg to the Class 2A Region Igirls track and field championship at Walkersville High School in Frederick County Saturday.

Glenelg edged the favorite, Middletown, 90-89.

"It was sort of a surprise that we won," Glenelg coach Jim DeNobel said. "We thought Middletown had a better team than they showed."

The Glenelg boys team turned in a somewhat disappointing sixth-place finish. Atholton also sent boys and girls teams to the meet: The Raider girls finished seventh and the boys ninth.

Girls

Glenelg failed to win a third straight county title a week ago, losing to Hammond by nine points, but the team came through Saturday.

"We tried real hard to win the county by moving girls around, but in regions, we just tried to put the girls in their best events to qualify for states," DeNobel said. "We hadn't planned on winning."

Calloway won the 400-meter run and Snyder won the shot put as Glenelg's only gold medalists.

The team showed a great deal of depth, winning two seconds, four thirds, four fourths, one fifth and one sixth. In all, the Gladiators will send 11 girls to the state meet this weekend.

Calloway was part of the second-place 1600 relay team that included Amy Ashby, Tammy Coon and Kelly Pelovitz. In addition to her gold medal in the shot, Snyder took a third place in the discus.

Glenelg also finished second in the 3200 relay with Coon, Tina Rankin, Alicia Adams and Pelovitz.

Kristina Adams finished third in the 3200 run and fourth in the 800 run. Kate Terry was fourth in the 3200 and fifth in the 1600. Her time of 5:35 qualified her for the state competition inthe 1600.

Alicia Adams finished only sixth in the 3200, but her time of 12:24 qualified her for the state championships. Sprinter Ashby finished third in the 200 and fourth in the 100. Tina Rankin finished third in the high jump and Mary Rose Rankin was fourth in the same event.

DeNobel noted that times were about the same as those in the county meet but not much better.

"But in the county meet, we had about 15 people run personal bests," DeNobel said.

Glenelg willface extremely rugged competition against Central in the state meet.

In other girls action at the same meet, Atholton's Vonda Jones qualified for state competition in three events, among them a spectacular showing of 5:21 in the 1600.

"That time was one of the fastest in the state this year," Atholton coach Graydon Webster said. "We thought that Walkersville's Christine Ober would be tough, but she finished only fifth."

Jones lost a heart-breaker in the 800 to Kelly Walsh of Middletown by a lean at the wire.

They went stride for stride the last 30 yards and Vonda had the inside lane," Webster said. "Ithought Vonda won it, but the officials thought otherwise."

Jonesalso ran on the Atholton 3200 relay team that finished fifth but qualified on the basis of its 10:27 time. (The qualifying time to beat was 10:29.) The team included Tara Getschman, Laurie Atherholt and Gail Hodges.

Boys

Glenelg's Mark Coleman won the 800, and the 3200 relay team of Mike Goldberg, Gerard Hogan, Eric Widmaier and Coleman also won.

Glenelg, which scored 52 points, ranked well behind winner Watkins Mill with 99. The Glenelg team also took two seconds andtwo thirds.

Aaron Browning was second in the pole vault at 12-0, a personal high. Hogan finished second in the 3200 in 10:15 and was sixth in the 1600. Widmaier was third in the 400 at 52.5.

Glenelg's1600 relay team, featuring the same runners as in the 3200, finishedthird in 3:37.

The only other point-getters for Glenelg were Travis Turner, who came in fifth in the triple jump at 37-8, and Jason Botterill, who placed sixth in the pole vault at 10-6.

Joe Rankin suffered a broken foot in a pick-up basketball game last week and missed the meet. He was a favorite to qualify for state competition in the3200 and 1600.

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