Soviet dancers rehearse with local students to put on a spring performance

ARTS NOTES

May 05, 1991|By Eric Siegel

Since the middle of last month, four members of the acclaimed Donetsk Ballet have been working with dance students at the Baltimore School for the Arts, teaching classes and overseeing rehearsals for a new work choreographed by the Donetsk's Vladimir Shumeiken.

The result of this special relationship can be seen by the public Friday to next Sunday when the school presents Mr. Shumeiken's "Waltz, Romance, Waltz" as part of its annual Spring Fever festival of performances and exhibitions.

The piece, in three sections, will be performed by Alexander Boitsov and Irina Boitsova of the Donetsk, four School for the Arts graduates who are working with professional dance companies and the school's top students.

"It's been a wonderful experience for the students," said Norma Pera, administrator of the school's dance department. "They're learning new things technically and really getting immersed in a professional atmosphere. Students are learning by totally concentrating on what they have to do."

Because members of the Donetsk, which will be performing "Don Quixote" at the Lyric Opera House May 17-19, don't speak English, Ms. Pera said, "the only common thread they have with the students is body language. The language difference isn't a barrier, it's a gateway."

The cost of the Donetsk members' participation at the city-run School for the Arts will be an estimated $15,000, according to spokeswoman Kathy Hillman, who said the money would come from private fund-raising efforts.

"Waltz, Romance, Waltz" will be performed at the school, 712 Cathedral St., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. and next Sunday at 7:30 p.m. A jazz dance choreographed by dancer-choreographer Hinton Battle, who is currently appearing in Broadway's "Miss Saigon," will also be performed, along with a modern dance piece by School for the Arts faculty member Stephanie Powell.

Tickets are $6, $4 for students and senior citizens. They are available one hour before each performance. For information, call 396-1185.

'Butterfly' was sellout

The Baltimore Opera Company, which was rescued from the brink of bankruptcy last December by an emergency fund-raising campaign, reports some good financial news. The BOC says "Madama Butterfly," the final production of the 1990-'91 season that concluded its run last Sunday, generated more than $140,000 in single-ticket sales, the highest such figure in the company's 40-year history.

The money was generated by the sale of 3,758 tickets, representing a total sellout of the opera, according to BOC officials. The previous record for single ticket sales was the $123,000 generated by last fall's production of "Carmen."

"Coming on the heels of the success of our $1 million Stabilization Campaign, it is exhilarating to see the groundswell of support demonstrated by Maryland operagoers in their enthusiasm for the Baltimore Opera Company," BOC general director Michael Harrison said in a statement.

The BOC is selling subscription tickets to its three-opera 1991-'92 season, which includes Verdi's "Don Carlo," Donizetti's "The Daughter of the Regiment" and Mozart's "The Magic Flute."

Federal-era fun

In the early 1800s, entertainer Richard Potter toured the East Coast with a show that included magic tricks, comic songs and ventriloquism. Potter's show will be re-created by Robert Olson Friday and Saturday nights at 7:45 p.m. at the Peale Museum, 225 Holliday St.

Tickets are $7 for adults ($5 for members of the Baltimore City Life Museums) and $3 for children. For information, call 396-3279.

Harborplace concerts

The free Summer Sunday Concert Series in the Harborplace amphitheatre continues today with an appearance by the Peabody Ragtime Ensemble.

Next Sunday the Baltimore Symphonic Band will play standard pops and classical selections, followed by the the Elkridge Chapter of the Sweet Adelines on May 19 and the big-band Tom Cunningham Orchestra May 26. All concerts begin at 7 p.m.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.