Five divisions waiting for some sun

AUTO RACING

April 28, 1991|By J. A. Martin

After two straight weekends of race-postponing rain, Hagerstown Speedway is ready for sun and speed.

Five divisions will be competing today (28) on the half-mile dirt oval. Hampstead's Charlie Schaffer is leading the points for the late models, which headline the day.

Limited late models will have their second points race of the season. Modified stocks will be involved in at 15-lap feature after qualifying heats. Daredevil division completes the day with the current racers.

The fifth group for today will be the cars of yesterday. More than 20 vintage stock cars have been restored to race condition. Some of the the cars are well over 30 years old and will present a very visual display of the changes in local track racers. Many will be driven by the same drivers that won with them then.

Next Sunday will be the Shorty Bowers/Bull Durham Memorial for late models. The event will be sanctioned by the Short Track Auto Racing Stars, so many nationally ranked drivers will be competing.

The best racers of Maryland International Raceway will be going head to head with the best of 75-80 in a battle of tracks today. Gates open at 75-80 site at 9:30 a.m. with eliminations beginning at 1:30 p.m. All classes will be involved.

Next Sunday the air heats up with the funny cars as 75-80 features the best fuel racers. The eight best will go head to head for the title. In addition the regular drivers will have a full program.

Mason-Dixon Dragway goes with a full program of NHRA bracket racing surrounding the powerful Top fuel alcohol funny cars today. Many of the cars will be making their first appearance in the East.

Next Sunday the Washington county track belongs to Mopar. It will be 8th Annual Mid-Atlantic Chrysler Meet. The meet will be in two parts with drag racing and show. From the Chrysler 300 of the '50s, the Road Runner and exotic Superbird of the late '60s, to the contemporary Daytonas, it's a day of Chrysler products.

They may be small but the go-Karts will be screaming around Summit Point Raceway this afternoon. The Woodbridge Kart Club is co-host of the event. Go-Karts have proved an invaluable first step of real racing for drivers as diverse as Michael Andretti, Formula 1 Champion Aryton Senna and NASCAR's Lake Speed.

Potomac Speedway is host to the Gene Van Meter 40 lap late model feature Friday evening. In addition there will be the regular show for the area dirt-track racers.

On Saturday afternoon Potomac goes to the karts for the regular show. Racing begins at 4 p.m.

Next Friday and Saturday, the cars return to Potomac. Friday will be the regular show. On Saturday there will be a 100-lap Enduro.

The karts will be back at Potomac on Saturday afternoon. Prince Frederick's Kevin Denton won his third straight semi-late model event at Potomac on April 19. Les Hare came down from Stewartstown, Pa., to take the late model race at the same event, while Rich Schmidt of White Plains took the title in pure street stock.

Johnny Meyers of Hanover took the best of the Class I racers at Capital Raceway on April 7. Butchie Ward of Glen Burnie matched with a class win in Class II. William Rice of Chesapeake defeated Pikesville's Rusty Cunningham for motorcycle honors.

If the rain leaves them alone, the drivers would return to Lincoln Speedway Saturday evening. The exact lineup depends upon who has been able to race so far this season. Three of the last four programs has been postponed due to rain.

Maryland drivers have been doing the state well in the national events of the National Hot Rod Association. James Bernard took his McHenry-based Suzuki to the Final Four at the Gator Nationals. At the Winston Invitational at Rockingham, N.C., Tim Peters of Westminster won in super stock class. Then Poolesville's John Speelman made it to the final eight in top alcohol dragster while NHRA regular Lee Dean of North East moved his Grand Prix to the elimination rounds.

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