Oldman's illness stops production of 'Dylan'

April 24, 1991|By Los Angeles Times

HOLLYWOOD -- Gary Oldman ("Sid & Nancy") as the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas. His real-life wife, Uma Thurman ("Henry and June"), as Thomas' wife. The appeal of the $4.5 million "Dylan," to be produced by London's Harlech Films (a division of HTV International) and distributed by Miramax, was apparent. But a funny thing happened on the way to the screen.

Nine days into the late-January shoot, Oldman collapsed on the set in Wales, said by doctors to be suffering from "nervous exhaustion." The production was shut down, in the words of a press release, "until such time as Oldman has regained his health and is available to re-start work."

Some insiders -- as well as the irrepressible London tabloids -- have cast the incident in a different light, however, claiming that Oldman's collapse was precipitated less by fatigue than by creative conflicts on the set. It is a charge that Harlech disputes.

Oldman is currently in Dallas tackling his next role: Lee Harvey Oswald in Oliver Stone's "JFK," an investigation into the assassination of President Kennedy. Kevin Costner also stars as former New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison.

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