Tennis stars and fans will honor their Maury

Sylvia's BALTIMORE

April 19, 1991

OUT AND ABOUT: The Baltimore Tennis Patrons Association is having a dinner to honor my Guy Friday, Maury Schwartzman, at The Harborcourt Hotel on Friday, April 26, at 7 p.m. Pam Shriver and a former student, Elise Burgin, are among the tennis greats who'll be there to honor him.

Schwartzman credits his former neighbor, Howard Kaplan, with stimulating his lifetime interest in tennis. Kaplan gave him a Frank Merriwell paperback book when he won a contest for the youngsters who could hit the most balls in a row.

Out of 50 contestants, he hit 165 in a row the very first time he'd ever had a racket his hands, at the age of 12. The racket, incidentally, was an old bludgeon of a hand me down from his uncle, Dr. Abel Wolman. Three years later, Maury was runner-up in the U.S. indoor doubles championship.

His students have included Andrea Leand, Elise Burgin, Steve ++ Krulevitz, Margaret Duncan, Burt Schonseld, Bert Vogelstein, Terri Salganik Sollins; Barbara Friedberg Rinder, Audrey Meier Anderson; Jessica DiCicco, Buzzy Hettleman, Malcolm Fox, Adrian Goldberg Hoffman, Joan Robinson Friedel, Ned Chapman, Ann Harrison Walker, Anne Koger, Chuck Abelson, David Freishtat and Harold Soloman.

Maury doesn't take the summer off -- he works with children, ages 6-15, who enroll in the Bare Hills summer camp. He and camp director Joanne Levy do a great job with these youngsters. For more info about the camp or the dinner honoring Maury, call Bare Hills 823-1626.

EAT YOUR HEART OUT: The Cafe des Artistes, tucked away in Mt. Washington, is brimming over with goodies. Certainly the food is divine, but owner Ann Clapp has executed a coup.

Imagine landing Jean Claude, owner of Jean Claude's at Harborplace before it closed and part owner of the Washington Place Grill, as the general manager of your restaurant! That's just what the Clapps have done, and Jean Claude seems delighted to be back. The Clapps had heard he was working in Aspen, Colo., but might be interested in returning to Baltimore, so Harvey Clapp flew there for a meeting and the rest is history. And what other place can you think of that has a professional magician tending bar. Jimmy Smith, one of Baltimore's most fascinating bartenders, is back at the Cafe.

Johnson's, formally Schaefer's, is the hottest new restaurant/bar South Calvert Street. The grand opening was last Sunday, and friends of owners Craig and Garrett Pfeifer, also owners of a T-shirt biz, Maryland Screen Printers, Bud Craven, owner of the Bay Cafe, and Brian Lazurus, Nard's Rock and Roll owner, filled the place. Among those spotted pigging out on 600 pounds of pit beef and an array of other goodies were Roland McKenzie, real estate consultant; Randy LeFaivre, owner of the Butler Did It; Tom Griffin, Starbus, makers of sailing and racing jackets; William G. Slaughter, Stone Steel Co.; Eileen Mainolfi, Harbor Court Hotel, and Tony Pappas, owner of Innovative Sounds production company.

KEEPING TRACK: Ain't love grand? One of the country's best-known jockeys, Jacinto Vasquez, who has spent most of his racing career in New York and Florida, now calls Maryland home. Vasquez has ridden such great horses as Ruffian, Genuine Risk and Foolish Pleasure. Sounds like the fillies like him! Of course he likes Maryland horses, but I'm told a Maryland filly named Kim Goodwin prompted the move. Home Team Sports fans know Kim as the host of the daily racing show, and she also works for Pimlico's marketing department.

Speaking of horses, the Kentucky Derby is only weeks away and it's still unknown whether Maryland's leading Triple Crown prospect, Tank, will run in the Derby. For some reason, Mrs. Allaire Dupont, who owned the fabulous Kelso, has been reluctant to commit her horse to the Triple Crown races -- yet.

BIRTHDAYS: First District Congressman Wayne T. Gilchrest, Monday; Orioles third baseman Craig Worthington, Wednesday

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