Phillips' Hollywood tell-all mixes brilliant observations with the barbs

Movies

April 18, 1991|By Lou Cedrone

Julia Phillips may eat lunch in Hollywood again, but it's safe to assume that she will be eating alone. Her ''You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again'' is at the top of the best-seller list this week, and there is little wonder why. Phillips, who helped produce films like ''The Sting,'' ''Taxi Driver'' and ''Close Encounters of the Third Kind,'' is aggressively outspoken in her recall of those years. She is equally frank about her addiction to drugs and her eventual exit from the film colony after she went to freebase.

She's given it all up now, but when she talks about it on television (and she does), she remembers how keen it all made her feel at the time, so up, so productive. You do wonder why she still isn't on the stuff.

Everybody in Hollywood is reading her book because she gives it to everybody she pleases. Among those who get it are Goldie Hawn, Erica Jong and Margot Kidder.

Phillips is anything but kind, but she can write. She writes, stream-of-consciousness style, like Timothy Leary talks, but she's much funnier than he is. It isn't the easiest reading, but it's very good in drabs.

Phillips is big with first names, names that mean nothing to the reader. You do long for a cast of characters.

Here and there, among the barbs, are some brilliant observations. She says about one acquaintance, who went to India to look for his soul, that ''if he had a soul worth finding, he could find it here."

You would't want to know Julia Phillips personall. If you did, you wouldn't want to say anything to her, not unless you'd want to see it in print. She, however, doesn't seem to care. She has a best seller, and how many former film producers can say they did lines at board meetings.

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So guess what the Towsontowne Musical Dinner Theater is going to do next? Guess again. It's Harvey Fierstein's "Torch Song Trilogy" which ran for several years on Broadway and filled a road engagement at the Mechanic. "Torch Song Triology" is a comedy-drama based on the life of a homosexual living in New York. It will open May 6.

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Pat Carroll, who won so much praise when she did Sir John Falstaff in "Merry Wives of Winsor" at the Folger Theater in Washington, won't be repeating the role when it is done at The Shakespeare Theater (Shakespeare Free for All) at the Carter Baron in Washington. "A persistent knee problem, necessitating surgery" is the reason. Carroll says she is "heartbroken" and hopes she'll be able to do the role once the knee is healed.

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When the 23rd annual Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival is held, April 22 through 30, one of the productions will be "The Playboy of the Western World" as

staged by the University of Massachusetts Department of Theater. What's so special about that? Well, the production was directed by Professor Edward Golden, one of the original founders of Center Stage, Baltimore's repertory theater. "The Playboy of the Western World" will be presented April 22 and 23 at the Kennedy.

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Want to help the homeless? F. Scott Black will present a special cabaret show called "Soup's On!" at the Harborlights Dinner Theater, South Broadway, Tuesday evening, April 23. Tickets will cost $7, and all proceeds wil go to the Beans and Bread Soup Kitchen in Fells Point. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. The Show begins at 8.

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Attention, film buffs: Now on sale at your local bookstore (if not, you can always order it) is "Monologues from Literature," described as "more than 100 distinguished movie speeches, some from well-known movies, some from unpublished screenplays, ranging from the late '50s to the early '80s."

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If you're heading for New York, you can still catch Baltimore's Pippa Pearthree in Alan Ayckbourn's "Taking Steps" at the Circle in the Square. The play will continue there through April.

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Joe Sears and Jaston Williams, who created ''Greater Tuna" and Christmas Tuna," will do one week of their Final Farewell Good-bye Tour at the Kennedy Center's Eisenhower Theater. The comedy, a collection of skits in which the two actors play all the roles, will open April 30 and close May 5.

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