Peabody will offer master's degree in electronic music

March 28, 1991|By Ernest F. Imhoff | Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff

The Peabody Conservatory will offer a new master of music degree in electronic and computer music starting in September, the first such program in the country to offer three specialized areas -- composition, performance and research.

Four faculty members, specialists in different aspects of computer music, will teach the program: Jean Eichelberger Ivey, Geoffrey Wright, McGregor Boyle and Edward Pirali. Wright directs the computer music department and designed the two-year degree program.

The computer music department for several years has worked with Johns Hopkins University in cross-disciplinary projects such studying bird song and creating music software. Joint resources of Peabody and Hopkins will continue to be used.

Applicants interested in entering the program should contact David Lane, director of admissions, 659-8110, for an interview at the Peabody Conservatory. Candidates may apply until September. The degree may be included in double majors.

Digital technology has exploded in recent years, expanding the creative potential of musical composition and performance. The computer music department's studios "combine the best of the MIDI-synthesis world with direct digital synthesis and digital audio editing on networked computer systems," Peabody said. "The three tracks offer you everything," a spokesman said.

Humans are also high-tech at the two schools, including musicians trained in the classics and ensembles for experimental playing. Further, The Computer Music Consort, a "digital arts ensemble" plays frequently at Peabody and in such spots as the Kennedy Center and Symphony Space, New York.

Ivey's "Voyager for Cello and Orchestra" received its world premiere Feb. 18 with an energizing performance by Mihaly Virizlay and the Peabody Symphony Orchestra at Friedberg Concert Hall.

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