J.R. Ewing's grandson sets a style in kiddie togs

March 27, 1991|By Mary Gottschalk | Mary Gottschalk,Knight-Ridder Newspapers

The Dynokids clothing line is proving to be dynamite both in sales appeal and screen appeal.

If you tune into "Dallas" Friday night, you'll see J.R. Ewing's grandson Jimmy sporting about in a Dynokids outfit. Over the next two months you're likely to see Jimmy wearing nine different Dynokids togs.

The twist to Dynokids is Dumpling the Dinosaur a stegosaurus who cavorts across each of the themed fleece jog sets for boys, sizes 2T to 7.

The current spring collection, priced from $20 to $26, includes "Bug Out" with Dumpling holding a glass jar with a bug inside. For fall, priced from $26 to $40, there is "Treasure Hunt" with Dumpling as a pirate aboard a ship; "Snapshot" with Dumpling holding a camera and saying, "Say cheese!"; and "Roller Blade" with Dumpling streaking along on you guessed it. The fall line also includes toys tucked inside pockets and microchips sewn into the garments that make sounds when pressed.

Based in Brisbane, just south of San Francisco, the Dynokids line is now in its second season. First-year sales topped $3 million and projections for the second year are $11 million.

Dumpling is the creation of Connie Romweber, who had her own line of women's and children's clothing before joining Dynokids. The clothes' appeal is obvious and wide enough to get the clothing line into Macy's, Nordstrom and other major stores across the country.

Making Dumpling as visible as possible has been the job of Rodney Anderson, marketing manager for Dynokids.

"I decided I needed to get a lot of exposure of this line because there's a lot of competition in children's clothing so I went with television. It's basically America's medium. There are millions of people watching television every night."

Rather than pay thousands for a minute of commercial time, the entrepreneurial Anderson uses contacts within the industry to gain introductions to the wardrobe people for major television series. It's a technique that has been successful. In addition to "Dallas," Anderson placed Dynokids togs on "Full House" in late February.

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