Adults will understand 'Ninja Turtles II'

March 22, 1991|By Lou Cedrone | Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff

''Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Secret of the Ooze'' is a decided improvement over the first film, one that performed very well at the box office. The kids loved the original, but they were the only people who could understand it.

People of all ages should understand the sequel. Whether or not they will all like it is something else. It does, though, have a trace of wit, lines aimed at the older generation.

In the sequel, the four Ninja Turtles have found a new home, an abandoned underground subway station where they can eat all the pizzas they want. Life above ground, however, is not that simple. Still roaming around up there are Ninja warriors, who are looking for the canister that was inadvertently tossed into the sewer and gave birth to the mutated creatures known as Michelangelo, Raphael, Leonardo and Donatello.

The Ninja warriors are led by The Shredder, who dresses like Darth Vader but sounds more like Arnold Schwarzenegger. Reappearing as mentor to the Ninja Turtles is Splinter, a king-size rat.

English actor David Warner is also in the film. He and the Ninja warriors have created two monsters the warriors intend to use in their criminal forays. At the same time, the warriors are looking for that canister.

The Ninja Turtles are not above kidding ''Casablanca.'' That's for the adults in the audience. The action footage is for the kids,

Corey Feldman was one of the turtles in the first film. He's been replaced in the second. Not that you can tell.

Appearing at the leader of a rap group is Vanilla Ice, leader of a rap group in real life.

''Ninja Turtles: The Secret of the Ooze''

** The Turtles learn how they got that way and try to prevent the responsible canister from falling into the hands of the wrong people.

CAST: David Warner

DIRECTOR: Michael Pressman

RATING: PG (violence)

RUNNING TIME: 80 minutes

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