Former Gilman student is an Oscar nominee

March 21, 1991|By Lou Cedrone

Richard Bryce Goodman, former Baltimorean who attended Gilman School, is one of four people nominated for a ''best sound'' Motion Picture Academy Award for his work on ''Hunt for Red October.'' Goodman, who worked for the Maryland Center for Broadcasting after graduating from Bucknell, has been in the film business for some 20 years.

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Todd Crockett, cinematographer for ''Alligator Eyes,'' an independent thriller made on locations in North Carolina, is from Baltimore. Also from Baltimore is John Feldman, who wrote and directed the film, which is currently winning favorable reviews at a string of film festivals, here and in Europe.

The plot has two men and and a young woman pick up a hitchhiker, a girl who was blinded as a child. What the trio doesn't know is that their passenger hopes to avenge a wrong done her when she was very young.

''Alligator Eyes'' will open at Washington's Biograph Cinema on April 5.

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The long-running ''Around the World'' lecture series sponsored by the Maryland Science Center at the Lyric Theater will be discontinued at the end of this season. Its spirit, however, may live on. The Science Center management intends to incorporate travel films in its IMAX program and is hoping to accompany these with lectures. When they have the details hammered out, announcements will be made.

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Steve Aronson, who grew up in Rockville, became an attorney for the federal government, then left that to pursue a career as an actor, has a small role in the forthcoming ''True Colors.'' He also has a small role in ''Iron Maze,'' an $8-million Japanese production which was filmed in Pittsburgh. ''True Colors'' will open here soon.

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So what happened to the Brat Pack? Emilio Estevez continues to do films, but others are not that much in evidence, including Moly Ringwald, queen of the pack.

Judd Nelson is in ''New Jack City,'' but it's only a supporting role. Meanwhile, Ally Sheedy, who was in ''The Breakfast Club'' and ''St Elmo's Fire,'' two of the better-known Brat Pack films, has moved to New York where she will be doing ''Advice From a Caterpillar,'' a ''new post-modern romantic comedy'' by Douglas Carter Beane. It opens April 4 at the Lucille Lortel Theater, off-Broadway.

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