More than 700 make Crystal Ball another big success

Sylvia Badger

March 19, 1991|By Sylvia Badger

THE MILDRED MINDELL Foundation celebrated in style at its third annual Crystal Ball Saturday night at Martin's West. (This group was the beneficiary of the premiere of Barry Levinson's film, "Avalon," which premiered at the Senator Theater in September.) With that in mind, the Crystal Ball was dedicated to the memory of Levinson's father, Irv, who has since died of cancer.

The star of the show, so to speak, was this year's honoree, Dr. Richard Kaplan, the head of neuro-oncology at the University of Maryland Cancer Center. Among the more than 700 people who attended were Drs. Joseph and Seena Aisner, he's the director of the cancer center; Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Schimpff, he's executive vice president of the university's medical system; Dr. and Mrs. Errol Reese; he's president of UMAB; Dr. and Mrs. Richard Richards, he's dean of the School of Medicine, and Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Wolpoff, he's a member of the medical system's board. Judy Rosner, president of the foundation, was thrilled that again this year the ball was so successful. That success is credited to the hardworking chairwomen, Thalia Resnick, Cookie Rosenthal, Annette Cooper, Lynda Ames, and Beverly Lazarus. No word yet on how much money was raised.

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Not even the rain could put a damper on the festivities in the Calvert Room of the State House yesterday. The occasion was the unveiling of a portrait of the late Sen. Verda Welcome, the first black woman state senator in the country, and a person I remember well because she was always so pleasant and helpful. Mrs. Welcome began her career as a teacher in Baltimore and went on to be elected to the House of Delegates and the Maryland Senate.

Her portrait is the work of artist Simmie L. Knox, whose portraits include Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Frederick Douglass, Dr. Mary McCleod Bethune, Alex Haley, the Bill Cosby family and Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, the latter due to hang in the Supreme Court. I found it interesting that with the Welcome portrait, Knox became the first African-American artist recognized by the Maryland Commission on Artistic Property.

The room was filled with guests invited by Senate president Mike Miller and House Speaker Clay Mitchell. Others invited to attend were Welcome's legal-beagle daughter, Mary Sue, who became prominent as the defense attorney for Wayne Williams, who was convicted of killing 23 Atlanta youngsters; Senate Majority Leader Clarence Blount, Del. Christine Jones and the Rev. Vashti Murphy McKensi of Payne Memorial Church, who blessed the portrait.

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Have you ever fantasized that you were singing the national anthem at a baseball game? Well, I have too, but I'm tone deaf. Tomorrow morning, rain or shine, interested contestants are invited to register between 9-10 a.m. at Washington's RFK Stadium.

More than 200 aspiring vocalists have auditioned over the past two years, so a crowd of hopefuls is expected. Two will be selected to sing the anthem prior to the 1991 COMSAT Baseball Classic, April 6 and April 7, which features the Orioles vs. the Boston Red Sox. This annual classic benefits Special Olympics International and the American Cancer Society. Past singers were Susan Chubik of Columbia, 11-year-old Victoria Burton of Cockeysville and Stephen Stokes of Mitchellville. Call TicketCenter/Ticketron for tickets to the classic.

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The cast of "Godspell" had a benefit performance at Essex Community College, and you can bet it was a good one, because they were the beneficiaries. This last-minute fund-raiser will help defray some of the costs of taking this one-act musical on the long road to Odessa, U.S.S.R. The trip to the Soviet Union is the second part of an exchange that began last summer when a group from Odessa put on a show at the college's Cockpit in Court theater. Among those expected to make the trip with producer William Ellis and director F. Scott Black are Liz Boyer, Anya Randall, Alex Auty, whose parents own Churchill's Restaurant, Darren McDonnell, Billy Burke and Ed Peters.

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Tune in WBAL-TV on Wednesday, April 3, at 7:30 p.m. and watch the E. Dean Crawford Evans family from Pikesville compete for the big money on "Family Feud." They auditioned in New York City, along with seven other families in October 1990 and were finally notified that they would be flying to sunny California to film the show.

Ms. Crawford Evans says not to look for the Evans name on the show, because she opted to use her maiden name of Crawford. Nope, they won't say if they won, so we'll just have to watch the show.

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