Male worker is charged in school guard's death

March 12, 1991|By Lynda Robinson

A 28-year-old groundskeeper was arrested yesterday and charged with first-degree murder in the bludgeoning last month of a young woman he had worked with at St. Timothy's School in Stevenson.

Police said Harvey Allen Teets Jr. of the 3000 block of Walnut Street, Manchester, was charged with murdering Kimberly R. Kenna, 23, who lived on the 234-acre Baltimore County campus of the exclusive girls' boarding school while she was working there as a part-time security guard.

Mr. Teets was denied bail and taken to a lockup at the Cockeysville precinct, police said. He is scheduled for a bail review hearing today.

Police offered no motive for the slaying but said that they had evidence linking Mr. Teets to the crime scene.

Miss Kenna's body was discovered Feb. 23 floating in a pond about 20 feet from the guard shack where she worked. She was clad only in her blue guard's jacket and a shirt. Her other clothing had been thrown into the water, police said.

An autopsy showed Miss Kenna died from a severe beating, especially about the head, police said.

Evidence gathered at the scene indicated that Miss Kenna was attacked in the guardhouse and then dragged to the pond. Police think Miss Kenna was caught by surprise and did not have time to use the walkie-talkie in the shack to alert school officials.

A teacher who was walking her dog past the guard shack shortly after 7 a.m. noticed Miss Kenna's white Chevrolet Beretta parked at the side of the road, the shack door open, a television on and blood on the ground.

The teacher followed a trail of blood about 20 yards to a small pond, which is partially bordered by a low stone wall, where she spotted Miss Kenna's body.

A native of Pittsburgh, Miss Kenna moved to Maryland about a year ago after graduating from Pennsylvania State University. A part-timer at St. Timothy's, she started working at TGI Friday's, a Towson bar and restaurant, about two months before her death. She was planning to save money for graduate school.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.