Jackson says he wants to stay with EaglesKeith Jackson...

Sports briefly

March 06, 1991

Jackson says he wants to stay with Eagles

Keith Jackson went to school yesterday in North Philadelphia and said afterward that he had learned his lesson. He was wrong, wrong, wrong when he called Philadelphia Eagles owner Norman Braman "stupid" for firing coach Buddy Ryan. He was wrong when he said he was going to cause so much trouble that the Eagles would have no choice but to trade him.

Jackson was at the Rhodes Middle School to kick off a stay-in-school campaign sponsored by the Philadelpia school system and Foot Locker. Students listened closely to Jackson, TC but when it came time for questions, they wanted to know what every other football fan in Philadelphia has been wondering.

"Are you gonna leave the Eagles?" was the first question.

Jackson laughed. "No," he said, "I'm not going anywhere. The Philadelphia Eagles are a team that is definitely going to be a contender for the Super Bowl next year, with the great quarterback and the great defense that we have, the great coach that we now have in Rich Kotite, the offensive line that we have. We are going to be in the Super Bowl next year. I definitely don't want to go to a team that is not in contention."

* Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Bubby Brister underwent arthroscopic surgery on his right shoulder to relieve pain caused by bursitis.

Brister is expected to make a complete recovery and should be ready for the team's mini-camp, which will begin in a few months.


Baltimore Blast defender Mike Reynolds underwent a Magnetic Resonance Imaging test last night to determine whether there is ligament damage to his left knee.

Reynolds has missed two games with a ruptured bursa sac ithe knee. He injured the knee Feb. 24 when he ran into the --er boards in a road game against the Tacoma Stars.

Blast trainer Marty McGinty said last night that the results of thMRI wouldn't be known until today.

"If there is ligament damage, the preliminary tests indicate it ifrom an old injury," McGinty said. "The early tests show it could be a posterior cruciate ligament. It also could be nothing, and if nothing is found, Mike should be back in 10 days."


Former American Basketball Association commissioner Mike Storen announced the formation of a new international league that will be called the Global Basketball Association.

The league will begin play in November, Storen said, and consist of at least four teams from the United States and teams from Italy and the Soviet Union. Ideally, Storen said, the league would consist of U.S. and world divisions with four to six teams in each.

Inaugural members will be from Greensboro, N.C., Greenville, S.C., Raleigh, N.C., and Nashville, Tenn., in the United States; Tallinn of Estonia in the Soviet Union; and San Marino, Italy.

The league, which plans a 64-game schedule and once-a-year visits to the United States by European teams and vice versa, will combine National Basketball Association and international rules and use a white basketball.

* The Detroit Pistons will wear black patches on their uniforms for the rest of the season in memory of Detroit News columnist Shelby Strother, who died Sunday of liver cancer at age 44.

A memorial service for Strother was scheduled last night at the St. Paul School gymnasium in Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich., and a second memorial will be held in Florida when his ashes will be scattered in the ocean.

Bits and pieces

The Men's Senior Baseball League of Baltimore, comprising junior league for players 23-29 and a senior league for players 30 and over, will hold a registration meeting tomorrow at 8:30 p.m. at the Dundalk Community College gymnasium. For further information, call Gary Bishop at 668-0620 after 7 p.m. . . . The United States Slow Pitch Softball Association is looking for a few teams to fill a Monday men's league and a Friday night coed league at Poly. For information, call Mark Schlenoff at 828-7007.

Spring training takes root

Baltimore Sun Articles
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.