Board OKs expansion for sewage treatment

IN THE STATE

February 28, 1991|By From Staff Reports

BALTIMORE BALTIMORE — Board OKs expansion for sewage treatment

The Board of Estimates approved yesterday a $35.6 million expansion of the Patapsco Waste Water Treatment Plant in Curtis Bay, a construction project that will be paid for entirely by Baltimore County.

Expansion at the plant, which can process about 70 million gallons of sewage per day, is needed to accommodate rapid development in the Owings Mills area of western Baltimore County, according to George G. Balog, Baltimore's director of public works. The city provides water and sewer service to portions of Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties.

The expansion, which is scheduled to begin this spring and to take about 2 1/2 years to complete, will bring the plant's capacity to 87 1/2 million gallons.

GAMBLING ARRESTS

Three men are charged in two-county operation

Police said yesterday that they arrested three men on gambling charges and seized more than $200,000.

The arrests culminated a six-month investigation of illegal gambling on basketball, football, horse racing and the lottery, police said. Police in Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties made the arrests Tuesday night.

Police allege that a Stevenson man headed the gambling operation. A search of the man's home and business, Animal Treats in Owings Mills, uncovered evidence of a gambling operation, they said.

Police would not say where the cash, $206,370, was found.

Police contend that the gambling operation had two main clerks.

Irving L. Miller, 44, of Stevenson and George M. White, 42, oBrooklyn Park are each charged with four counts of sports-lottery wagering. Vernon L. Resau, 48, of Glen Burnie is charged with two counts of sports wagering.

The three men were released on their own recognizance.

24-year-old man found shot to death in alley

WEST BALTIMORE

A 24-year-old man was found shot to death yesterday in a West Baltimore alley, police said.

The body of Troy Patterson of the 1100 block of Abbott Court, East Baltimore, was found shortly after 7 a.m. in the alley of the 200 block of North Monroe Street with a gunshot wound in the forehead, police said.

Mr. Patterson is the 50th person slain in Baltimore this year, three fewer than at this time last year, police said.

FOR THE RECORD

* Baltimore police are seeking a 35-year-old West Baltimore woman who walked away from a home-monitoring program on Sunday. Brenda Gibson of the 600 block of Delaware Avenue was last heard from at 1 p.m. Sunday. Police said they were notified yesterday that she was missing.

The Board of Estimates approved yesterday a $35.6 million expansion of the Patapsco Waste Water Treatment Plant in Curtis Bay, a construction project that will be paid for entirely by Baltimore County.

Expansion at the plant, which can process about 70 million gallons of sewage per day, is needed to accommodate rapid development in the Owings Mills area of western Baltimore County, according to George G. Balog, Baltimore's director of public works. The city provides water and sewer service to portions of Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties.

The expansion, which is scheduled to begin this spring and to take about 2 1/2 years to complete, will bring the plant's capacity to 87 1/2 million gallons. Gene L. Neff, public works director for Baltimore County, said the expansion should cover the county's needs through 2010.

Spring water-bottling OK'd for farm owner

HOWARD COUNTY

Plans to bottle spring water on a 111-acre farm in central Howard County have been approved by the Board of Appeals.

Thomas Taro, a retired contractor who raises race horses, received a special exception to zoning laws that will allow him to bottle 36,000 gallons of spring water a day on his farm along

Sheppard Lane near Folly Quarter Road.

The board, which reached its decision Feb. 19 and released it this week, turned down Mr. Taro's request to tap into well water on the site.

Conwell F. Sapp, attorney for Taro Investment Corp., said bottling should begin in mid-May if Mr. Taro can get a permit from the state Water Resources Administration.

She said the water will be sold under the label of the Brickhouse Farms Water Bottling Co.

"The water bubbles up in a spring house on the property, and friends and relatives of Mr. Taro have been coming for years to take jugs of water home," Ms. Sapp said.

Before his operation was approved, Mr. Taro successfully pushed for an amendment to zoning laws to allow water-bottling in agricultural areas with a special exception.

The appeals board limited Mr. Taro's operations to 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays with no more than five employees, no external lighting, no retail sales at the site and no more than three trips a day by delivery trucks.

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