Anderson Sees Opportunity In Sports

Celebrating Black History/ 'Black Athletes Are Doing Better'

February 26, 1991|By John Harris III

While ecstatic about the rapid change in women's athletics, Carolyn Anderson, the physical education department head at Marley Middle School, is just a bit disappointed in the participation rate of black females.

"I see some progress, but things could be a lot better thanthey are," said the 20-year physical education instructor. "(Black females) are not taking advantage of all of the wonderful opportunities they have before them. Between home and school, they just aren't responding. There won't be any change from the present situation unlessthey are pushed to participate at home."

No one needed to push Anderson, 43, to become involved in athletics. Ever since the seventh grade, the ex-three-sport athlete knew that she would become involved in physical education.

At both Bates High School (class of 1965) and Maryland State College (now the University of Maryland Eastern Shore), Anderson participated in volleyball,basketball and softball. She began her teaching career at Arundel High School and has spent 18 years atMarley Middle.

She has taken a great interest in sports, not only as an educator, but as an officialas well. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, Anderson officiated basketball and volleyball at the junior high, high school and college level.

"Officiating was a great experience for me," she said. "Not only did I get the chance to travel the state and see the different levels of play, but it kept me in great shape."

Anderson credits timing and a love of her profession for being able to escape the many potential prejudices of being both female and black.

"I guess I came along at a good time. I've never felt the pressure of prejudice while being involved in the school system -- at least not anything that I couldn't handle. It feels great to do something that you enjoydoing," she said.

In addition to chairing the physical education department at Marley, Anderson works with the school's mentorship program for high-risk children and with the school's dance club.

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