Man charged in woman's shooting death Reservoir Hill man, 23, is believed to be getaway-car driver, police say.

February 21, 1991|By Richard Irwin | Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff

A 23-year-old Reservoir Hill man was charged last night with first-degree murder in connection with the slaying of a state correctional officer, who was gunned down outside her Forest Park home, police said.

Police described the accused, Kevin Moses, of the 2100 block of Brookfield Ave., as the boyfriend of one of the victim's daughters. Police also said that the slaying may have been caused by a dispute between the accused and the victim.

Moses, who also was charged with using a handgun in the commission of a felony, was being held without bail at the Central District lockup pending a bail review hearing today in District Court, police said.

About 8:40 a.m. yesterday, Theresa Katrina Johnson, 41, of the 3600 block of Gwynn Oak Ave., was approached from behind by a gunman as she was about to enter her home and shot several times in the head, police said.

The gunman ran from the scene, and witnesses saw him enter a maroon compact car that sped off, police said.

Homicide Detective Michael Crutchfield said Moses is believed to have been the driver of the car.

Police said the gunman, who wore a black jacket with the picture of an 8-ball on the back, remains at large.

A spokesman for the Maryland Division of Correction said Johnson had been a correctional officer since 1985 and worked at the Reception, Diagnostic and Classification Center on Greenmount Avenue and Madison Street. She had worked the 11 p.m.-to-7 a.m. shift beginning Tuesday night.

Police said Johnson was returning home after taking a grandson to school when she was slain.

Crutchfield said that while police were at the scene and investigating the slaying, Moses arrived and identified himself as the boyfriend of one of Johnson's daughters.

He said Moses was taken to police headquarters downtown and interviewed as a witness. Several hours later, Moses was charged in Johnson's slaying, Crutchfield said.

Crutchfield said Moses was not the triggerman but that his alleged role as driver of the getaway car with apparent knowledge that a slaying had occurred made him culpable.

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