Etta Mae Hutcheson, 98, a blackjack-packing child of the...

Deaths elsewhere

February 21, 1991

Etta Mae Hutcheson, 98, a blackjack-packing child of the frontier who was one of Arizona's first women state legislators, died Tuesday in Tucson, Ariz. Mrs. Hutcheson, a Tucson Democrat, served nine terms in the state House from 1954 through 1972. She picketed for women's suffrage in Tucson in 1917 but said she didn't subscribe to the women's rights movement. "Why should I step down to the level of a man?" she was quoted as saying.

Louis Kelso, 77, an investment banker who pioneered the stock buyouts that allow employees ownership of the companies where they work, died Sunday of a heart attack in San Francisco. In 1956, he conceived the employee stock ownership plan as a bridge between the philosophies of socialism and capitalism.

Carlo L. Golino, 77, a former administrator and professor at the Universities of California and Massachusetts and an authority on Italian literature, died Feb. 14 of heart failure at his home in La Selva Beach, Calif. Mr. Golino was a professor, chairman of the Italian department and dean of humanities at the University of California at Los Angeles. Later he was a dean and vice chancellor at the University of California at Riverside and was a professor and the chancellor of the University of Massachusetts at Boston.

Arnold Gurin, 73, a former professor and dean at Brandeis University, died of an aneurysm Feb. 15 at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. He joined the faculty of Brandeis in 1962 as an associate professor of social welfare administration. He became a full professor in 1966 and was named to the Maurice B. Hexter Chair in American Philanthropy in 1971, the year in which he began his five-year term as dean of the university's Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare.

Arnold Gurin, 73, a former professor and dean at Brandeis University, died of an aneurysm Feb. 15 at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. He joined the faculty of Brandeis in 1962 as an associate professor of social welfare administration. He became a full professor in 1966 and was named to the Maurice B. Hexter Chair in American Philanthropy in 1971, the year in which he began his five-year term as dean of the university's Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. He retired in 1982.

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