TelevisionTrip down memory laneOne show was a raucous...


February 16, 1991|By Steve McKerrow


Trip down memory lane

One show was a raucous breakaway from convention, while the other was television's last regular gasp of the vaudeville stage, and both are getting attention on CBS this weekend. At 8 tonight (Channel 11) comes the "All in the Family 20th Anniversary," with highlights of the social satire series which in 1971 gave us Archie Bunker (Carroll O'Connor), "Dingbat" Edith (Jean Stapleton), "Meathead" Michael (Rob Reiner) and all the rest. And at 9 p.m. tomorrow, "The Very Best of the Ed Sullivan Show" brings back Old Stoneface and some of the "reealy big shews" he provided for 23 years. French director Jean-Paul Rappeneau does for ''Cyrano de Bergerac'' what Franco Zeffirelli did recently for ''Hamlet.'' Like Zeffirelli, Rappeneau has given an honored classic new life, thanks to the director's sense of style and the leading man, Gerard Depardieu, who will likely be nominated for an Academy Award for his work here. Depardieu plays the poet-soldier whose soul is much more beautiful than his outsize nose. The film is showing at the Charles, in French with English subtitles. Rating: PG. ****


Sailors on leave

Winifred Walsh

A splendid rendition of Leonard Bernstein's joyful musical "On The Town" is currently on stage at Toby's Dinner Theatre. Directed by Toby Orenstein, this entertaining '40s dance show (book and lyrics by Comden and Green) regales the amusing misadventures of three sailors on leave. Great old songs ("New York, New York") are sung by Sherri Edelen and the exceptionally talented cast. South Entrance Road, Columbia. Tickets: $29.95. Call 730-8311. Don't miss the retrospective of work by the late photographer Prentice Hall Polk at the Albin O. Kuhn Library of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Official school photographer at Tuskegee Institute for almost 50 years, Polk documented the life and culture of the Black South, especially the growing black middle class. This show of 65 black and white photographs, dating from the 1920s through the 1960s, records weddings and civil rights meetings, glamour and pain. Like many in this exhibit, the photograph seems to commemorate the triumph of aspiration. Through March 10. Weekend hours: Saturdays from Noon to 6 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 9 p.m. Call 455-2065.


"FLATLINERS" Journey to the unknown

Lou Cedrone

''Flatliners'' has a group of medical students conduct an experiment in which they ''die'' then come back to life. They learn, as all explorers do, that there can be danger in the unknown. Kevin Bacon, Kiefer Sutherland and Julia Roberts play three of the students who take part in the experiments. The film is repetitious at start, but vastly entertaining when it gets down to the reason for all this tinkering. Sex, language, violence. Rating: R. **

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