Opera plans 'Don Carlo,' 'Daughter' and 'Magic Flute'

February 13, 1991|By Ernest F. Imhoff | Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff

THE BALTIMORE Opera Company will perform Verdi's "Don Carlo," Donizetti's "The Daughter of the Regiment" and Mozart's "The Magic Flute" next season, it told its subscribers in mailings this week.

''Don Carlo,'' with James Morris singing King Philip and Kristjan Johannsson as Don Carlo, is scheduled Oct. 19, 23, 25 and 27. The Daughter of the Regiment,'' in French with Nova Thomas, is March 21, 25, 27 and 29, 1992. ''The Magic Flute,'' with Carroll Freeman and Kay Paschal, is set for April 25,29, May 1 and May 3, 1992.

The subscriber prices range form $48 to $309 before April 1, 1991, and from $53 to $320 after.

"Don Carlo" is late Verdi (1867), a musically rich, long opera based on the historically incorrect Schiller play about the tortured affairs of Philip II, King of Spain; his son, Don Carlo; Elizabeth and Princess Eboli in 16th century Spain and France.

The Donizetti comedy (1840) is pure bel canto singing of lyrical melodies amid mischief and good fun. "The Magic Flute" (1791), broadcast just last Saturday as the Metropolitan Opera's 1,000th Texaco-sponsored opera, is a treasure of Mozart song and philosophical complexities.

There are those who consider "Don Carlo" and "The Magic Flute" their composers' best operas. Fewer make the same claim for "The Daughter of the Regiment," but it has been extremely popular in recent decades.

The three-opera season follows the current four-opera year. All familiar and popular works, the 1991-92 offerings assure patrons that the next five operas are solidly in the mainstream, if not adventuresome.

Remaining on this season's schedule are Verdi's "A Masked Ball" March 9, 13, 15 and 17 and Puccini's "Madame Butterfly" April 20, 24, 26 and 28.

The "Masked Ball" soloists will be Bulgarians Stefka Evstatieva and Mariana Paunova, Ruben Dominguez, Robert McFarland and Judy Berry.

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