Parkinson To Lead County Budget Office

February 12, 1991|By Elise Armacost | Elise Armacost,Staff writer

Dennis H. Parkinson, a top state budget officer, was named Monday tohead Anne Arundel's budget department.

Parkinson's appointment comes less than three weeks after County Executive Robert R. Neall pushed a bill through the County Council increasing the allowable starting salary for top-ranking administrators hired from outside county government.

The bill was designed specifically with Parkinson in mind. Neall has been wooing him ever since former county budget officer Marita Brown resigned to take a post in another county.

Parkinson, a 44-year-old Edgewater resident, will join the county work force April 8.

Under the new law, which allows high-ranking appointees hired from outside county government to be brought in at the top of the salary range, Parkinson will be paid $76,871. He makes $86,029 at the state level.

The old law would have prohibited Neall from offering Parkinson more than $65,000 -- more than $21,000 less than he makes now.

Parkinson has served as deputy secretary of the Maryland Department of Budget and Fiscal Planning since 1987. From 1981 to 1987, he was the department's state budget director and from 1979 to 1981 its assistant secretary for operations.

Parkinson was chairman of the budget department's Procurement Advisory Council and executive director ofthe Governor's Task Force on State Procurement Regulations.

Before joining the state budget department, he served as the Maryland Department of Human Resources' assistant secretary of administration and as principal analyst for the Maryland General Assembly's Department of Fiscal Services.

During the early 1970s, Parkinson was a senior management consultant and program director in the Washington, D.C., office of Science Management Corp., a management consulting firm. A Navy veteran, he also worked under contract to NASA and the Department of the Navy.

"I am confident that, in Dennis, we have one of the most able county budget officers in the United States," Neall said in a written statement Monday.

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