City gets 7 bids to renovate Mount Vernon fire station

February 07, 1991|By Edward Gunts

A vacant fire station in the Mount Vernon historic district could be converted to anything from artists' residences and studios to a drop-in center for people with AIDS, depending on which of seven proposals the city selects.

The two-story fire station at 831 N. Calvert St. was built in 1910 and formerly housed Fire Truck Co. 16. City housing department officials received the bids in January in response to a request for proposals in October. Bill Toohey, a department spokesman, FTC said officials will consult with community representatives as part of the review.

In seeking bidders, city officials said that they would give preference to proposals from developers "involved in the architectural, graphics, engineering design or advertising fields." They also said they would give preference to developers who plan to be owner-occupants.

The bidders were:

* Anthony Michael Taresco, a local contractor who promised to offer free space on the first floor of the building to be used as a "drop-in center" by the Health Education Resource Organization, a group set up to address the needs of people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The second floor would contain one residence and office or studio space for graphic designers, architects or others.

Mr. Taresco offered to pay the city $25,000 or the appraised value of the building. B. J. Taresco Construction Co. would be the contractor.

* Elm Associates, a group headed by Mark E. Green and George Toboll, which proposed to rehabilitate the fire station for use by an unspecified tenant and to pay the city $140,000 for the building. Centerline Construction Co. would be the contractor, and Probst Mason would be the architect.

* Firehouse No. 16 Limited Partnership, headed by attorneys Harold Hersch and Jeffrey Lauren, which proposed to rehabilitate the first floor for their own offices and to convert the second floor to two two-bedroom apartments. They offered to pay the city $90,000 for the building. Sea to Sea Construction would be the contractor, and Duke, Srygley P. A. would be the architect.

* Local artists Paul Daniel, Linda DePalma and Ellen Burchenal, who proposed to convert the first floor and part of the second floor to studios for themselves. They would convert the rest of the second floor to an apartment for Mr. Daniel and Ms. DePalma, who are married. They offered to pay the city $10,000 or the appraised value of the building. Struever Bros. Eccles and Rouse would be the contractor, and Ayers Saint Gross would be the architect.

* Art and Architectural Design, headed by architect Steven A. Glassman, which proposed to convert the first floor to offices for Art and Architectural Design and to convert the second floor to a residence for Mr. Glassman. They offered to pay the city $100,000 for the property. About Face Remodeling would be the contractor, and Art and Architectural Design would be the architect.

* Calvert-Fallsway Associates, a group that includes James Walsh, David Shull, Paul Dombrowsky, Perry Savoy and Glennon Threatt, proposed to convert the first floor to offices for Mr. Shull's architectural firm and one efficiency apartment. The second floor would become four apartments. The group offered $90,000 for the property. Shull Architects Inc. would be the architect.

* Stephen Rosenbaum, a doctor who has offices next to the fire station, who proposed to convert the property to offices for a design firm to be identified later. He made no firm monetary offer for the property.

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