Call, Nighthawks turn out Jacks' light

February 04, 1991|By Nestor Aparicio | Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff

The anger in the locker room after last night's Skipjacks game wasn't so much about losing it to New Haven as much as how it was lost.

Down 3-2 with less than 30 seconds remaining, the Jacks poured into the Nighthawks' zone with an extra attacker, looking for the equalizer.

With 11 seconds left, a Ken Lovsin shot made its way behind goalie Robb Stauber, but clearly inches from being over the line. The crease was quickly flooded with players and after the net was jolted off of its moorings and the pile was removed, it appeared the puck was in for a goal. Goal judge Dick Witler turned on the blue lamp indicating a goal.

But referee Dave Jackson waved off the goal -- the second time in the game and the third time in two nights -- leaving the Jacks looking for answers.

"It seems our goal judge's judgment isn't good enough," said Jacks coach Rob Laird. "Why have a goal judge if you're going to overrule him? [Jackson] hasn't been real great to us."

Many of the players mentioned the officiating, but agreed the Jacks could have won with or without Jackson's help if they would have played a better first period. After spotting the visitors a 3-1 lead early in the second period, the Jacks outplayed the Nighthawks in every facet of the game.

But Stauber, with help from a crack defensive unit, was spectacular in goal, thwarting every attempt for a rally.

"We fell behind early, but we had a long night to get back into it and we took the play to them hard down the stretch," Laird said.

Center Alfie Turcotte Turcotte got an assist on the Jacks' second goal, a power-play score from Tyler Larter. Steve Seftel got the Jacks' first goal. Ross Wilson, Darryl Williams and Micah Aivazoff scored for the New Haven.

The Jacks play five of their next six at the Arena, beginning tomorrow night against Hershey, whom they defeated 6-5 Saturday night.

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