Bruins Blow Big Lead, Down Eagles, 74-62

February 03, 1991|By Lem Satterfield | Lem Satterfield,Staff writer

Just over two minutes remained in the third quarter and Broadneck's boys basketball team had just blown a 17-point lead.

On top of that, Northeast's Craig Everett had just scored to bring his team within 48-47, when Broadneck coach Ken Kazmarek was called for his second technical foul of the game -- sending the Eagles' Steve Strauss to the line to tie the score at 48-48.

Under these conditions -- not to mention the fact that the Class4A Bruins (12-4) were coming off of a 73-39 loss to Annapolis -- it would have been easy for Broadneck to throw in the towel.

Unfortunately for Class 2A Northeast (10-5), that didn't happen.

In fact, the Bruins outscored the Eagles, 22-10, to overcome a 54-52 deficiten route to a 74-62 victory.

"I thought it was very difficult toplay away at Northeast after what happened at Annapolis," said Kazmarek. "Northeast was short a man (Kevin Mursch), and I'm sure that affected them, but I was very pleased with our runs at Northeast."

The Bruins got solid efforts from Matt Weimer (20 points), Johnny Williams (18, 10-of-10 from the line) and Jeff Vincent (11, with two three-pointers).

Broadneck switched to a fourth-quarter zone to snuff the Eagles' momentum. At one point, the closing stretch included 12 points by the Bruins against nine consecutive misses by the Eagles.

"It all fell apart with their quick shots," said Northeast coach John Barbour, whose Eagles dropped their previous game, 58-53, to Arundel. "We usually play well against a zone and had people we wanted in there shooting, but we were a little impatient. You can't miss like that when they've got a 7-foot-2 center."

Boris Beck (nine points, 11 rebounds, two blocks) is the player he meant. Beck was coming off a 12-point effort against Annapolis and capitalized on Northeast's size. The Eagles were missing most of their inside game without their three tallest players, all of whom stand 6-3.

Forward Kevin Mursch did not play because he was late to school, and Scott Rey was out with an ankle sprain.

An ankle injury also kept swingman Strauss from starting, but he came off the bench -- albeit with a noticeable limp -- for 25 points, including 9-of-11 free-throw shooting.

Broadneck was without 6-1 forward Marlon Bailey, who missed the game with the flu. But 6-0 junior guard Maurice Washington contributed eightpoints and some much-needed hustle. Broadneck's Damian Spain also had eight points.

"Everyone contributed," said Kazmarek. "But we were fortunate to be able to go with a junior like Washington."

In building a 39-29 halftime lead, the Bruins shot 17-of-31 from the field compared to the Eagles' 10-of-26.

The Bruins built a 17-13 lead in the first quarter behind Weimer (six points), Vincent (five points) and Williams (four points.) Vincent scored his first three-pointer then.

Gene Pleyo (16 points) had five first-quarter points for Northeast, including an underhanded hook shot over Beck.

Broadneck led, 17-9, before Zach Herold (seven points) fed Strauss on a fastbreak and then scored off a tip-in for the first-quarter margin.

Broadneck, however, opened the second quarter with a 10-0 run and quickly led, 27-13, with 5:03 left in the half. It held the biggest lead, 35-18, midway through the period, but the Eagles came back behind Strauss' 12 points in the period.

Vincent opened the second-quarter scoring with his second three-pointer of the game.

Then Williams split the Eagles' defense with a sprint to the bucket that started from midcourt. He followed that with a steal and a similar full-court drive -- this time slipping the ball around a defender to Washington for the basket.

Washington made two free throws and Vincent connected on a double-pump put-back.

Strauss finally scored for the Eagleswith about five minutes left. His four straight free throws made it 27-17.

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