Jet, tank games nab windfallMicroProse, a Hunt Valley...

DESERT STORM -- Notes from the home front

January 23, 1991

Jet, tank games nab windfall

MicroProse, a Hunt Valley computer software firm, has profited nicely from sales of its realistic combat computer games, several of which are modeled on American weapons now pounding Iraq.

The company's F-15 Strike Eagle, F-19 Stealth Fighter and M-1 Tank Platoon games have done particularly well since the Persian Gulf war began, company spokeswoman Kathy Gilmore said yesterday. "We've been swamped with calls," she added.

The F-15 Strike Eagle II game, which sells for $54.95, includes a Persian Gulf theater in which living-room pilots can test their skills.

"You can dogfight, you can hit ground targets," Gilmore said. "There are oil rigs, chemical reactors . . . all sorts of targets."

MicroProse was founded in 1982 by John W. "Bill" Stealey, a former Air Force pilot, and the company's games have been praised for their realism.

The company "absolutely" feels guilty about its windfall, Gilmore said, adding that the firm sent an F-15 arcade game to American troops stationed in the gulf.

"It's a very sticky situation. We're not promoting war," she said. "Actually, we're doing just the opposite. We'd much rather have people fight their battles on computer. . . ."

SOME PREFER ORANGE

Yellow ribbons seem to be the preferred color for supporters of the troops in the Persian Gulf, but some people are choosing orange.

Since November, Mary Jane Wright has led Maryland's "Operation Orange Ribbon," part of a nationwide campaign that started in Cincinnati last August when a mother wanted to show support for her son as he left for duty in the gulf.

Wright's son, Army Staff Sgt. Donald Kahrs, 32, shipped out to Saudi Arabia two days before Christmas.

"Our purpose is to let them know that they have family and friends and we're carrying them in our prayers and in our hearts," said Wright of West Friendship in Howard County. "When I talked to my son the last time, he said he didn't need anything. He just said, 'Don't let anyone forget us.' "

The orange ribbons aren't meant to replace the yellow ribbons that symbolize support for soldiers at war. They're just special for Operation Desert Storm, Wright said.

CITY BACKS TROOPS

The Baltimore City Council passed a resolution last night in support of the troops fighting in the Middle East. The measure, which passed unanimously, also expressed the council's hope for a quick end to the conflict and urged that channels be kept open for a possible diplomatic solution.

Councilman Lawrence A. Bell III, D-4th, the chief sponsor of the resolution, said he wanted to draw a sharp distinction between supporting the troops and backing the war.

Bell said, "I think President Bush boxed us into the war and I have grave doubts about our reasons for being there."

WAR HITS ACADEMIA

Area college students are confronting the war in different ways. The Johns Hopkins Committee Against the War scheduled a rally today on the Hopkins Homewood campus.

"We want to support our troops by bringing them home safely," the organizers said yesterday.

Just north of Hopkins, an informal survey of the windows of Loyola College's high-rise student apartments on West Cold Spring Lane found a robust show of patriotism. American flags flew in at least six windows and there were a handful of written messages supporting American troops.

At the University of Maryland College Park, where students returned to class this week after semester break, an anti-Saddam Hussein rally yesterday attracted more than 100 students who waved American Flags and sang the national anthem. An anti-war candlelight vigil later attracted only a handful of people.

Area college students are confronting the war in different ways. The Johns Hopkins Committee against the War scheduled a rally today on the Hopkins Homewood campus.

"We want to support our troops by bringing them home safely," the organizers said yesterday.

Just north of Hopkins, an informal survey of the windows of Loyola College's high-rise student apartments on West Cold Spring Lane found a robust show of patriotism. American flags flew in at least six windows and there were a handful of written messages supporting American troops.

At the University of Maryland College Park, where students returned to class this week after semester break, a pro-war rally yesterday attracted more than 100 students who sang the national anthem and waved American flags.

Students held signs reading, "It's more than oil" and "Iraq: Nuke 'em til they glow, shoot 'em in the dark," and chanted, "Hey, hey, ho, ho, Saddam Hussein has got to go."

An anti-war candlelight vigil later yesterday attracted about five people.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.