Theater festival sets 1930 Russian satireAn adaptation of...

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January 20, 1991|By J. Wynn Rousuck

Theater festival sets 1930 Russian satire

An adaptation of Vladimir Mayakovsky's 1930 Russian futurist satire, "The Bath House" -- the latest work by Baltimore's Impossible Industrial Action theater company -- will be presented beginning Thursday as part of the Experimental Theatre Festival jointly sponsored by Towson State University and the Theatre Project.

Adapted by Sarah Peyton and Ro Malone, the production is a multimedia music theater work featuring 20 actors and musicians and inspired by sources ranging from the Marx Brothers to Russian futurist and constructivist theater.

"The Bath House" will be presented in the Fine Arts Building at Towson State, Thursdays to Sundays at 8 p.m., with matinees Saturdays at 2 p.m., through Feb. 3. Admission is $8. For more information, call 830-2787.

@ An African-American art show and sale, featuring the posters, prints and original works of artists such as Romare Bearden, Joshua Johnson, Claude Clark and Ernie Barnes, will be held tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Columbia Hilton, 5485 Twin Knolls Road in Columbia.

Presented by the October Gallery, an organization dedicated to seeking out, cultivating and presenting the works of promising young black artists, as well as displaying the works of established black artists, the show has been presented in Boston, Chicago, New York and Washington. Admission is free. Call (800) 458-8602.

Kevin Brown "Magic Voices," a music theater piece performed by a troupe of six Bulgarian singers and dancers, opens a two-week run at the Theatre Project Wednesday.

The work has "no real story line except that it emotionally describes life from birth to death," says director Damian Popchristov of the program of Bulgarian folk songs, religious hymns and contemporary tunes.

"Magic Voices" will be presented at the Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St., Wednesdays to Saturdays at 8 p.m., with matinees Sundays at 3 p.m., through Feb. 3. Tickets are $10 to $16. For more information, call 539-3091.

@

J. Wynn Rousuck

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