Janet Chusmir, 60, executive editor of the Miami Herald...

Deaths elsewhere

December 24, 1990

Janet Chusmir, 60, executive editor of the Miami Herald and a fighter for the advancement of women in newspaper management, died Saturday at a Miami hospital after suffering a brain aneurysm. In Ms. Chusmir's three-year tenure as executive editor, the Herald won two Pulitzer Prizes and introduced El Nuevo Herald, a Spanish-language newspaper with a separate staff. Last month she was named editor of the year by the National Press Foundation, which cited her for "transforming the Herald to serve the unique multicultural population of greater Miami." She held a journalism degree from Boston University but married and had two children before moving to Miami Beach in 1963 and taking a job at the now-defunct Miami Beach Daily Sun. She was hired as a reporter by the Herald in 1968 and became a columnist and editor before the parent Knight-Ridder Newspapers named her president and publisher of the Boulder Daily Camera in Colorado in 1982. Five years later, she returned to the Herald as executive editor.

Gershom Gustav Schocken, 78, editor of the respected Israeli daily Haaretz for more than 50 years and one of the country's most acclaimed journalists, died Saturday in a Tel Aviv hospital. Born in 1912 in Zwickau, Germany, he was the eldest son of a businessman and art collector who established the Schocken Publishing Houses. Mr. Schocken studied economics at Heidelberg University from 1932 to 1933, when he moved to Palestine with the rise of the Nazis. His father purchased Haaretz in 1937, and Mr. Schocken was appointed editor in 1939. In 1955, Mr. Schocken was elected to Israel's Knesset, or parliament, as a member of the Progressive Party.

Cecil Effinger, 76, a composer who was best known for his choral music and who invented a stopwatch that determined tempos and a typewriter for musical notation, died of heart failure Saturday at his home in Boulder, Colo. He was associated with colleges and orchestras in Colorado for virtually his entire professional life. But his inventively harmonized music traveled widely. Dark, evocative works like the "Four Pastorales" (1962) became popular staples of the university choir repertory, and several of his sacred settings, including the "St. Luke Christmas Story" (1953) and the "Cantata for Easter" (1971) are frequently sung by church choirs.

Gershom Gustav Schocken, 78, editor of the respected Israeli daily Haaretz for more than 50 years and one of the country's most acclaimed journalists, died Saturday in a Tel Aviv hospital. Born in 1912 in Zwickau, Germany, he was the eldest son of a businessman and art collector who established the Schocken Publishing Houses. Mr. Schocken studied economics at Heidelberg University from 1932 to 1933, when he moved to Palestine with the rise of the Nazis. His father purchased Haaretz in 1937, and Mr. Schocken was appointed editor in 1939. In 1955, Mr. Schocken was elected to Israel's Knesset, or parliament, as a member of the Progressive Party. He was was one of the founders of Itim, Israel's national news agency, and was named international editor of the year by the New York-based World Press Review in 1983.

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