Design For Expansion

December 22, 1990|By Edward Gunts

James R. Grieves Associates, the architectural firm that designed the soon-to-open Marine Mammal Pavilion on Pier 4, will expand and take on a new partner effective Jan. 1, making it one of the few architectural firms in the Baltimore area to be experiencing growth.

Phillip W. Worrall, previously a partner of Browne, Worrall and Johnson and later, Worrall & Associates, will become a new principal in the firm that architect James R. Grieves launched in 1969. Other principals will be David Wright and Robert O'Hatnick, longtime associates of Mr. Grieves. The firm's new name will be Grieves, Worrall, Wright & O'Hatnick, Inc./Architects.

Mr. Grieves said the number of employees will grow from 12 to about 20 as a result of the merger with Mr. Worrall and that his office at 5 E. Read St. has expanded into the adjacent building to accommodate the growth.

In addition, Mr. Grieves' firm has been working with the Richard Rogers Partnership of London on the $200 million Christopher Columbus Center for Marine Research and Exploration, and the Rogers firm plans to open a U.S. office next spring on the upper level of the Grieves, Worrall offices. It will start with about five employees in the United States, he said.

Other current projects of the firm include the conversion of the Hackerman House in Mount Vernon to an

Asian Arts Museum for the Walters Art Gallery; the Center for the Arts at St. Paul's Schools; renovations at the College of Notre Dame; a new theater arts facility for McDonogh School; and a new field house on the Homewood campus of the Johns Hopkins University.

Mr. Grieves' office is one of the few in Baltimore that consistently has been hired for buildings outside the Baltimore area as well as locally. He said the new firm will continue to pursue institutional and government commissions and other projects in Baltimore and beyond.

"Phil and I have known each other for years, and we think we're going to be much stronger and better able to serve our clients" with the combined firms, Mr. Grieves said.

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