Anti-apartheidSports coaches could be going to South...

Sports briefly

December 21, 1990


Sports coaches could be going to South Africa next year with the full approval of the anti-apartheid movement, one of the movement's leaders said yesterday.

Sam Ramsamy, executive chairman of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee, said recent reforms in South Africa warrant sending coaches to improve the skills of black athletes.

"But we will not be allowing all and sundry to go to South Africa," Ramsamy said. "It must be done through the coordinating committee of all the sports organizations involved."

Ramsamy said the International Olympic Committee and the African sports movement had agreed to the move. He said he also had gained agreement in principle from the United Nations, which compiles an annual blacklist of athletes and coaches who travel to South Africa, despite international sanctions against sports contacts there.

South Africa has been banned from international sport since 1970. There have been moves for reinstatement once apartheid is abolished.

Ramsamy's comments came on the day that IOC president Juan Antonio Samaranch was quoted in Germany as again saying that South Africa might return to the Olympic Games in 1996.


At the urging of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the California Supreme Court agreed to decide whether mandatory drug testing of college athletes in the state violates the right to privacy.

A four-member majority of the court voted to grant a hearing on the NCAA's appeal of a lower-court ruling, the first by any appellate court in the nation to declare the athletic drug-testing program invalid.

The court's action removes the lower appellate-court decision from the books and reserves the issue for the high court to decide at a later date.

* Auburn University wants out of its 10-year football contract with Florida State as it prepares to play eight league games when the Southeastern Conference expands in 1992.

And irate Florida State officials want the contract, which runs through 1999, honored.

"As far as Florida State is concerned, we're playing them," school sports publicist Wayne Hogan said.

Hogan said Florida State athletic director Bob Goin was telephoned a few days ago by Auburn's Hindman Wall, associate athletic director in charge of scheduling.

"How do you replace a game that's a national television game that's just a little over nine months from now," Hogan said. "If he [Wall] was testing the waters, there was a tidal wave that resulted."

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