Tunku Abdul Rahman, 87, Malaysia's first prime minister...

Deaths elsewhere

December 07, 1990

Tunku Abdul Rahman, 87, Malaysia's first prime minister, died yesterday in Kuala Lumpur. The tunku, or prince, was prime minister from 1957 to 1970 and had become known as Bapa Malaysia -- the father of Malaysia. The son of the former sultan of northern Kedah state, he led the country that was then called Malaya to independence from Britain in 1957.

Bill Hardman, 57, a U.S. jazz trumpeter and a leading member of drummer Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers group in the 1960s and 1970s, died recently in a Paris hospital of a brain hemorrhage.

Lucy Dawidowicz, 75, author of a definitive study of the Nazi Holocaust and a prominent Jewish historian

and scholar, died Wednesday of cancer in New York. Her "The War Against the Jews," published in 1975, is considered a pioneering study of Nazi genocide. In it she postulates that the destruction of the Jews was central to Nazi ideology and as important to Hitler as conquering Europe. The New York-born Ms. Dawidowicz taught Holocaust studies at Yeshiva University in New York. Ms. Dawidowicz lived in Vilna, Poland, from 1938 to 1939. There she witnessed the force of European anti-Semitism and recounted the experience in a memoir, "From That Place and Time," published last year.

Edward Binns, 74, a stage-trained character actor whose roles included television detectives and classical figures, died of a heart attack Tuesday en route to his home in Warren, Conn.

Edward Binns, 74, a stage-trained character actor whose roles included television detectives and classical figures, died of a heart attack Tuesday en route to his home in Warren, Conn. Mr. Binns, who had a distinctive gravelly voice, played dozens of strong and working-class characters during his 40-year career. He played a dedicated Army officer in "Command Decision" on Broadway in 1947 and appeared on hundreds of live plays on television in the 1950s. He also starred in the police series, "Brenner," as a seasoned detective. His films included, "Twelve Angry Men," "Teresa," "North by Northwest," "Fail Safe," "Patton" and "The Verdict."

The Rev. Francisco Oves Fernandez, 62,the retired Roman Catholic archbishop of Havana, Cuba, died of an apparent heart attack Tuesday in El Paso, Texas, where he was pastor of Santo Nino de Atocha Catholic Church. Father Oves was among hundreds of priests driven from Cuba in the early 1960s as Communists led by Fidel Castro consolidated power. Oves was allowed to return to Cuba in the late 1960s, and in 1969 was ordained auxiliary bishop of Cienfuegos, Cuba. Father Oves was named archbishop of Havana, the capital of a nation that was officially atheist, in 1970 by Pope Paul VI.

Charles Brown MacDonald, 68, a military historian and former deputy chief of the Army Center of Military History, died of cancer and lung disease Tuesday at his home in Arlington, Va. Mr. MacDonald was captain of an infantry rifle company in Europe in World War II. In his first book, "Company Commander," he wrote of his battle experiences in Europe. The book became a popular item at West Point and other military academies. A 1942 graduate of Presbyterian College, where he was in the Reserve Officers Training Corps, Mr. MacDonald received his diploma and a commission at graduation. He wrote or helped write more than a half-dozen books, including three U.S. Army histories of World War II.

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