Minor-league magnate's latest baseball idea is capital one

John Steadman

October 29, 1990|By John Steadman

NOTEworthy Day:

Annapolis is the latest Maryland community to be eyed by Peter Kirk, owner of the Frederick and Hagerstown franchises, for a minor-league team (Triple A classification) and there is even talk of plans, as incongruous as it seems, for putting a club in Memorial Stadium after the Orioles move to their new facility. Also a long shot is a minor-league representative for Washington, which would be a crowning insult to a city that deserves only the majors. Notre Dame linebacker Mike Stonebreaker, born in Baltimore when his father, Steve, was with the Colts, has a distinguished baptismal godfather, a Hall of Fame quarterback named John Unitas . . . The Senior Golf tour is an overwhelming success but some (not all) of the swings are so arthritic they're painful to watch . . . Maryland put the naming of its last two football coaches in the hands of Jack Scarbath and he gave them Bobby Ross and Joe Krivak . . . Western Maryland's connection at St. Paul's School, Mitch Tullai and Mike Rentko, members of the Green Terrors' last undefeated football team, are elated over the turnaround of their alma mater . . . Tommy Byrne and wife Sue returned for hall of fame induction at Baltimore City College and then paid a visit to Frederick to spend time with Martha Keller, widow of his former New York Yankee teammate . . . It's ex-Oriole Willie Miranda's belief if the new stadium isn't named for Babe Ruth then every major-league player, past and present, should take it as a personal affront.

Where are they now: Jim Owens, a 1950 Colt and later coach/athletic director at the University of Washington, is vice president of Rowan Companies in Houston . . . Sportswriter Ken Myers, once of USA Today, is planning a lawsuit against the Cleveland Browns for allegations some players threatened bodily harm and threw pieces of equipment at him after he wrote stories they resented . . . New president of National Football Foundation/Hall of Fame is Francis "Reds" Bagnell, an illustrious halfback at Penn and now a multi-dimensional leader for charitable causes in Philadelphia. He once played for the Bainbridge (Md.) Naval Station Commodores . . . Umpire Terry Cooney, who ejected Roger Clemens in the American League playoffs, told The Sporting News that baseball is "completely different than 10 to 15 years ago. It's a modern business; not a game." . . . Sportswriting lost a gem with the death of Barney Nagler, columnist of the Daily Racing Form.

Chairman Tom Kernan and golf tournament committee of Mary Heim, Bud and Mary Ellen Carter, Vern Axt, Emma Steinweidel, Bob Adamecz, Rosalie Moulden and Alberto raised more than $8,000 for the Linwood Children's Center . . . WBAL's Jim West gets the maximum out of limited time each morning, but the sportscaster who does the most with the maximum is Pat O'Malley, whose radio sports shows on WBEY/WYRE are the most listened-to in Anne Arundel and Queen Anne's counties . . . Talk about coincidence: The Dartmouth Alumni Magazine reviewed the famous "Fifth Down" game of 50 years ago, citing Cornell's superb decency in giving back the "victory," and asked if it could happen again? An emphatic no as Colorado kept a "fifth down" win over Missouri . . . Sports Illustrated's salute to Sam Lacy, sports editor of the Afro-American, is a first-class presentation . . . With speculation over the future of Towson State football, doesn't coach Phil Albert wonder if he shouldn't have taken the earlier offer from dear old Maine?

Louisville, with ex-Colt coach Howard Schnellenberger, is 7-1-1 and expecting a bowl bid . . . Boxing trainer Lou Duva's babbling is tougher to take than listening to promoter Don King . . . Coach Nick Wischuck will be surrounded by his former Dundalk amateur football players at a testimonial Nov. 30 at Dundalk's K. of C. Hall . . . Dunbar High grad Johnny Grier, a NFL referee and a planning engineer with C&P Telephone Co., is recovering from knee injury and is expected back on the field shortly . . . A golfer in St. Paul, Minn., hit a wild shot headed to the right of the green on a par-3. But in mid-air it collided with another ball coming the opposite way and caromed into the cup for a hole-in-one.

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