200-year-old family Bible

MARKET VALUE

October 28, 1990|By James G. McCollam | James G. McCollam,Copley News Service

Q: I have a very old Bible (1795) in excellent condition. It was published in Edinburgh by Mark and Charles Kerr, His Majesty's Printers. I would appreciate anything you can tell me about its value.

A: First, it must be understood that there were more Bibles printed than all other books combined; old Bibles are not rare. Bibles like yours, which is about 200 years old, commonly sell for $100 to $200 in very good condition. There are exceptions, such as those illustrated by famous artists like Gustave Dore.

Q: Someone told me that old beer cans are collectibles. Is that true? I found one labeled "Red Top Ale" -- it has a cone top and takes the kind of cap that used to come on pop bottles. Does this have any value?

A: There are lots of old beer cans that are worth very little. Some, like your cone-top can, are valuable. They were introduced in the mid-1930s and were used for only a few years. Your Red Top Ale can would probably sell for $50 to $60 in good condition.

Q: Is there any significance to an English Royal Doulton mug commemorating the marriage of the Prince of Wales dated 1893?

A: This was the marriage of the later King George V and Queen Mary, the grandparents of the present Queen Elizabeth II. The mug would probably sell for at least $200.

Q: I have a 33-piece service for six of china marked "Hall" in a circle. The pattern is orange poppies with green leaves. I am interested in learning whatever you can tell me about this.

A: This is apparently the "Poppy" pattern made by the Hall China Co. in East Liverpool, Ohio. A complete set like this would cost at least $300 to replace. If you are selling, you will probably have to settle for less.

Send your questions about antiques with pic-ture(s), a detailed description, a stamped, self-addressed envelope and $1 per item to James G. McCollam, P.O. Box 1087, Notre Dame, Ind. 46556. All questions will be answered but published pictures cannot be returned. Mr. McCollam is a member of the Antique Appraisers Association of America.

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