Flashbacks

FLASHBACKS

October 17, 1990

COUNTY HOMEMAKERS TAKE FORMAL TOUR OF CITY 50 YEARS AGO (WEEK OF OCT.

13-OCT. 19, 1940):

Ninety-three county homemakers and their friends made a formal tour of Baltimore this week. The group first toured the Red Cross Building, where they viewed films featuring wartime Red Cross work. After lunch in the dining room of a large department store, the women paid a visit to Bethlehem Steel's shipbuilding division. Following a stop at Federal Hill, the tour concluded at Fort McHenry.

* Dedication ceremonies were held in the gymnasium of the Ellicott City Elementary School for the opening of Howard County's long-awaited first public library, located in a building adjacent to the elementary school.

Judge Joseph N. Ulman, a member of the Supreme Bench of Baltimore City, was the guest speaker at the ceremony. Plans were announced for the opening of library branches in each of the county's election districts. Howard was the last county in Maryland to have its own public library.

25 YEARS AGO (WEEK OF OCT. 10-OCT. 16, 1965):

Plans for the New City of Columbia were threatened this week by a lawsuit filed by James and Anna Hepding of Simpsonville. The suit, filed against the county commissioners, the county planning commission and Howard Research and Development (HRD), alleged that Hepding's property, located at routes 32 and 29, would be "adversely affected" by the proposed New Town District zoning. Hepding also stated that the zoning changes had been made "for the sole benefit of one property owner."

* A cross was burned on the ground of Glenelg High School last Friday evening while a school dance was being held. The 10-foot-tall cross was carefully constructed and had been sunk into the ground with post-hole diggers.

The burning cross was first noticed at about 11 p.m. by a student who thought at first that a tree was on fire. County police who responded termed the incident a prank, but many of the students at the dance thought otherwise.

Information for this column was culled from the Howard County Historical Library archives.

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