UM wins grant as center for global business study

September 20, 1990|By Maria Mallory

The College of Business and Management at the University of Maryland College Park, with the blessing of the U.S. Department of Education, took a step yesterday toward its decade-old goal of being a leading training ground for globally competitive executives.

The UM business school announced that it has received a $240,000 grant from the department to act as a national Center for International Business Education and Research. As a recipient of the three-year renewable grant, the school joins an elite fraternity including business schools from 16 universities.

Mandated by Congress in an amendment to the 1988 Trade Act, the CIBER program was established to cultivate an international perspective and renewed competitiveness for U.S. companies.

As a CIBER participant, UM's business college will function as a conduit to research, instruction and programming for area students, business people, government officials and other academic institutionsinterested in expanding exports. Markets in Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union, Latin America and eastern Asia will be emphasized.

Maryland's CIBER -- the only one in the mid-Atlantic region -- serves as a clearinghouse for the other CIBER locations, said Dr. Rudolph P. Lamone, dean of the College of Business and Management at College Park.

The university will work with Gov. William Donald Schaefer "to make Maryland a state with a strong presence in the international community," Dr. Lamone said at a news conference yesterday announcing the grant.

Lee E. Preston, director of internationalization at the business college, said that about half of the funds from the grant will go to research. In addition, the program must provide training, conferences, workshops and other programs for the region.

Participating in the CIBER program "ensures that students will have exposure to international business, other cultures and how business is done elsewhere" in the world, said Dr. William E. Kirwan, president of the university.

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