Black-tie party offers art and auction for MAP

Sylvia Badger

September 18, 1990|By Sylvia Badger

THERE WAS something for everyone at the seventh annual black-tie "Art Party" to benefit the Maryland Art Place (MAP). Three different settings set the mood for the art and guests Saturday night. The first floor was sleek and ultra modern, while the second floor was an elaborate gold and red salon created by Delores Deluxe, and the underground cabaret was where the more daring original works were hung and sung by Lambs Eat Ivy and Joyce Scott, who sang an original song dedicated to Sen. Jesse Helms, the conservative nemesis of the art world.

Gala party planners were Sally Abbott, Janice Adams, Carolyn Bodie, Mark Caplan and Adam Gross. Earlier this year Abbott, MAP's Gala Guru for years, learned that her husband, Tom, had gotten a big promotion with AT&T and they were relocating to New Jersey. So, in addition to her valiant efforts for MAP, Sally had to sell their Lutherville home and oversee the building plans for their new home. Fortunately for MAP, Janice Adams stepped in full time once she and her husband, Harold, had married off their son to his high school sweetheart.

The walls were filled with art for sale, but if that wasn't your bag, you could join in a lively auction of getaways, dinners, gift certificates and such, which was a big success, thanks to Peter Bosworth and Fredye Murphy, who put people in the mood when they sang an original song, "MAP and Money."

Everyone agreed that the most artistic dessert award should go to Charles Levine for his Italian Cream Cake topped with an elaborate chocolate Italian sculpture. Among those getting their fill of artwork and desserts were Baltimore's own film maker, John Waters; artist Mary Ann Mears, nursing a broken foot, was on the arm of her husband, Bob Embry; WCBM's Rudy Miller looked great with her new haircut; Claudia Amory, new director of School 33; BMA's Arnold and Pat Lehman; artists Betsy Heuisler and Tom Miller, who both have one-man shows going on at local galleries; and John and Lenel Srochi-Meyerhoff. Lenel worked with Debbie Swartz on the auction, which raised more than $13,500.

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The Vagabond Players celebrated the opening of their Diamond Jubilee 75th season Friday night at its home at 806 Broadway in Fells Point. This amazing group went through two world wars, the Depression and many changes in theatrical taste. H.L. Mencken wrote the group's first play and attended rehearsals in a tiny theater on Centre Street. In the '20s and '30s, Mildred Dunnock, Mildred Natwick, Evelyn Varden and Garry Moore performed on the Vagabond Stage. And I could go on and on.

John Bruce Johnson, president of the Vagabond Theatre, was thrilled with the hoardes of special guests who attended the presentation of Ruth and Augustus Goetz's romantic drama, "The Heiress." After the performance, everyone gathered at the Admiral Fell Inn for a champagne reception. If we want them to be around another 75 years, we must support their productions, so stay tuned.

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Special congratulations to football greats Tom Matte, Art Donovan, Joe Ehrmann, Jim Mutscheller, Stan White, Toni Linhart and news guys Jack Dawson, Dave Humphrey and The Evening Sun's Larry Harris. All of these men have in some way helped make the Ed Block Awards Dinners successful over the years and therefore helped raise a lot of money to aid abused children. That's why they were named Ed Block Courage Award Foundation Goodwill Ambassadors, the highest honor the foundation can pay volunteers.

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Last week, Goucher College president Rhoda Dorsey threw a "book" party for Dr. Frederic Musser. He's the author of "The History of Goucher College, 1930-85." Musser, who has been on the Goucher faculty since 1964, noted that he's the only living and not certifiably insane person who has read all the minutes of the board of trustees, executive committee and the faculty from 1939-1985. The book is available at Goucher Bookstore for $32.50.

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Marvin Bush, the youngest son of President and Mrs. George Bush, will be in Baltimore Monday night to attend Fall-De-Rol at the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel. This annual party is given by the Maryland Chapter of the National Foundation for Ileitis and Colitis and will honor children with Crohn's disease and colitis. Bush will give special presentations to children who suffer from this disease.

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GBMC employees and volunteers went to the Towson Center last night to see a special Smothers Brothers performance. WBAL radio's Alan Prell, aptly billed as a long lost Smothers brother, emceed the show, which was part of the medical center's 25th anniversary.

Why the Smothers Brothers? GBMC's staff and volunteers were polled as to who might appeal to all ages, and the Smothers Brothers won the poll.

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