New Yorker indicted as suspected head of Baltimore drug ring

September 14, 1990|By Roger Twigg

A New Yorker who police said used cash, drugs and violence to establish a $4-million-a-year heroin and cocaine ring in East Baltimore has been indicted along with 33 other alleged members of his organization, the Baltimore state's attorney's office said yesterday.

Complaints from residents of the area where the group operated prompted the investigation that led to the indictments, police said.

The alleged ringleader, Billy Guy, a 25-year-old native of the Bronx, N.Y., was said to have marked his $10 bags of heroin with "G Force" to identify them with his organization. He was arrested yesterday along with 13 other alleged members of his group.

Teams of officers were continuing to search last night for members of the gang who were still at large.

A total of 73 sealed indictments was handed down by a grand jury last Friday, said Stuart O. Simms, the state's attorney.

Police Commissioner Edward V. Woods said that 12 of those arrested are from New York and one from Washington. Mr. Guy and two others were indicted under the Maryland kingpin laws, Mr. Simms said.

The police said they seized 10 pounds of heroin, 2 pounds of cocaine, more than $40,000 worth of gold jewelry, $25,000 in cash and five guns.

Commissioner Woods said it was residents in the area of Barclay and 22nd streets who were responsible for bringing the operation to the attention of the police.

"It was through their efforts that we were able to bring this to a successful conclusion. They were the ones who kept calling and complaining," the commissioner said.

Heroin is still considered to be the drug of choice in Baltimore -- unlike New York -- and, as a result, some New York drug dealers have moved here, police said. The influx has stirred competition and resulted in violent confrontations, they said.

Sgt. John V. Sieracki of the Eastern District said members of the Guy operation are suspected of killing a man during a drug dispute three months ago at Barclay and 22nd streets.

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