Developers Get To See Road Impact Results

September 12, 1990

Developers got their first chance this week to find our what could be required of them if a proposed growth-control law is passed by the County Council.

The county Department of Planning and Zoning on Monday released results of its 1991 Road Facilities Test, which examined the condition of roads and intersections serving 17 developments and gave developers options of ways to improve deficient roads.

The test is the first indication of what will be in the Design Manual for roads, an integral part of the Adequate Public Faacilities Act introduced to the County Council Sept. 4 by County Executive M. Elizabeth Bobo.

The Design Manual and its counterpart, the School Facilities Manual, will tell developers and county planners how to test a development's impact on local roads and schools and what the developer must do to help improve them.

Joseph Rutter, deputy ddirector of Planning and Zoning, said he expects both manuals to be completed in time for the County Council's special public Facilities Act Tuesday night, Sept. 18.

Of the seven residential and 10 commercial development projects tested by county planners, three were judged too costly or difficult to remedy in time for immediate development. Overburdened roads in those areas would probably force a deferment of those developments, the study said.

One of the projects judged for deferment, a 66,800-square-foot research and development facility planned by the W.R. Grace Co., failed the test because of unacceptable traffic levels on Route 32 and two nearby intersections.

Apart from the deferment, the 120-job project could proceed if the company were willing to provide $2.5 million worth of road improvements, the study said.

Of the other sites tested, eight passed the road test and six were judged able to pass if developers made road improvenents ranging in cost from $227 to $4,550 per residential unit and up to $1,670 per 1,000 square feet of commeercial or industrial space.

The test is the first indication of what will be in the Design Manual for roads, an integral part of the Adequate Public Faacilities Act introduced to the County Council Sept. 4 by County Executive M. Elizabeth Bobo.

The Design Manual and its counterpart, the School Facilities Manual, will tell developers and county planners how to test a development's impact on local roads and schools and what the developer must do to help improve them.

Joseph Rutter, deputy ddirector of Planning and Zoning, said he expects both manuals to be completed in time for the County Council's special public Facilities Act Tuesday night, Sept. 18.

Of the seven residential and 10 commercial development projects tested by county planners, three were judged too costly or difficult to remedy in time for immediate development. Overburdened roads in those areas would probably force a deferment of those developments, the study said.

One of the projects judged for deferment, a 66,800-square-foot research and development facility planned by the W.R. Grace Co., failed the test because of unacceptable traffic levels on Route 32 and two nearby intersections.

Apart from the deferment, the 120-job project could proceed if the company were willing to provide $2.5 million worth of road improvements, the study said.

Of the other sites tested, eight passed the road test and six were judged able to pass if developers made road improvenents ranging in cost from $227 to $4,550 per residential unit and up to $1,670 per 1,000 square feet of commeercial or industrial space.

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